Abstract only
Family history, towns, landscape and other specialisms

IX New approaches: family history, towns, landscape and other specialisms In the nineteenth century antiquarianism was an umbrella which sheltered a variety of specialisms connected with what we would today call local history. Eventually some of these specialisms ducked out from under the umbrella to make their own way in the world as separate disciplines, notably archaeology and history. Unfortunately, what was left tended to be seen as the parts no one else wanted, and ‘antiquarian’ gradually became a pejorative term. The image was perpetuated by the seemingly

in Writing local history
Abstract only
Britain and the sea

Afterword v Afterword v Britain and the sea: new histories Jan Rüger A century ago it was universally accepted by the educated world that naval history belonged at the heart of British history, but for much of the intervening period it has been relegated to the margins of serious history, regarded as a subject interesting, if at all, only to specialists and enthusiasts. It is still widely assumed that sea power mattered only in the context of empire; making it irrelevant and faintly embarrassing for the historian anxious to explore areas of relevance to modern

in A new naval history
Abstract only

XII Conclusion Local history is one of the major leisure interests in this country today. Every week thousands of people attend lectures, read documents in archive offices and books in local studies libraries, study artefacts in museums and heritage centres, and watch television programmes and read magazines, which in one way or another tap into this huge national interest. Local history ties together all sorts of disciplines, including academic subjects such as history and geography, and adult education and WEA classes. It brings together librarians, archivists

in Writing local history
A programme for the teaching of history in the post- national era

Teaching history at American colleges and universities currently undergoes significant changes and transformations. Fundamental questions are raised about how we teach history and what we teach as history. There is the pressure of university administrations and boards of regents to develop online courses which students can take at their own pace. The large survey courses in American and World History are relocated from lecture halls into the virtual world of the internet where students are guided through the material with interactive tools

in The TransAtlantic reconsidered

IV The parish and the town If the county was the preferred unit of study, the parish increasingly came to be viewed as the practical limit of most scholars and, following loosely from this, it was only a short step towards discussion of the town as a separate place. Studies of towns inevitably began with London, particularly the great survey published by Stow at the end of the sixteenth century. No other towns were in the same league in terms of size and status, but it is no surprise to find histories being compiled of cathedral towns and some of the larger

in Writing local history
Abstract only

I Introduction It has long been a complaint, that local history is much wanted. This will appear obvious, if we examine the places we know, with the histories that treat of them. Many an author has become a cripple, by historically travelling through all England, who might have made a tolerable figure, had he staid at home. The subject is too copious for one performance, or even the life of one man. (William Hutton, A History of Birmingham (2nd edn, 1783), xi–xii) Local history is all around us. Our family, our house, our street, our community, all have a

in Writing local history
Abstract only
British queer history

Introduction: British queer history Brian Lewis In a 2002 article in the Independent, the author and columnist Philip Hensher latched on to a recent government decision about how to refer to gay people in legislation. ‘Homosexuality’ was to be replaced with ‘orientation towards people of the same sex’. Otpotss? ‘I suppose it could catch on, given time.’ But if not that, then what? What do we call ourselves? Homosexual? Too medical, ‘and no one wants to go round with a diagnosis round his neck’. Gay? ‘One puts up with it … dopey as it is, so long as it stays an

in British queer history
Abstract only
The region and the community

VIII New approaches: the region and the community The developments of the 1950s had various results. First, they produced a vigorous methodological debate about the purpose and function of local history. Under the wing of economic history, local history had flourished, and in the 1960s it was to be just as significantly affected by the rise of social history. Second, through the rapid spread of interest in the subject at all levels, new questions were raised about access to the sources, and the use of the data. In 1957 it was still possible to walk into one of

in Writing local history

Introduction 1 In recent decades new geographies of imperial history writing have emerged. The boundaries that used to delimit separate domains of British history, imperial history, area studies and the histories of former colonies have been traversed promiscuously. Accompanying and propelling this reconfiguration of spatial categories has been more explicit attention to the

in Writing imperial histories
The eighteenth and nineteenth centuries

century. The second was the development within antiquarianism of natural historical and archaeological studies. Archaeology, although still within the family of antiquarian study, was emerging as a discipline in its own right, particularly with the founding in 1770 of the journal Archaeologia. Finally, the county history grew in terms of both output and size. What Dugdale and Thoroton had achieved in a single folio volume now multiplied into two, four and as many as twelve to a county. Although quantity was not necessarily paralleled by quality, it would be churlish to

in Writing local history