Power, culture, and society

This book interrogates the interplay of cultural and political aspects of contemporary Hollywood movies. Using ‘security’ films dealing with public order and disorder (Part I), romantic comedies and other movies presenting intimate relationalities (Part II), socially engaged films offering overtly critical messages (Part III), and analysis of Hollywood’s global reach and impact (Part IV), it articulates and illustrates an original cultural politics approach to film. The book employs an expanded conception of ‘the political’ to enquire into power relations in public, private, and policy arenas in order to advance a new framework and methodology for cultural politics. It demonstrates how movies both reflect and produce political myths that largely uphold the status quo as they shape our dreams, identities, and selves.

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An introduction
Katie Barclay

authority. In this, he was not alone. The history of masculinity is now a burgeoning field with the way men created and understood their identities explored in different contexts, from marriage to the military.3 Whilst early studies aimed to explore hegemonic, or dominant, perceptions of manhood and compared ideals to experience, it is now known that multiple masculinities can exist alongside each other, competing for control in different contexts (or not competing at all).4 The relationship between masculinity and femininity is highlighted, where men make sense of

in Men on trial
An epilogue
Joanne Begiato

masculinity manifest. This epilogue, therefore, explores the continued resonances of emotionalised bodies and material culture for contemporary masculinities. Studies of the traumatic events of the twentieth century acknowledge the centrality of men’s bodies and emotions to the making and remaking of manliness through mechanised warfare and its aftermath.1 Even so, the role of the specific nexus of men’s bodies, emotions, and material culture in the formation of modern masculinity can bear further analysis. The power of emotionalised bodies and material culture to formulate

in Manliness in Britain, 1760–1900
Author: David W. Gutzke

This is the first book about women’s advance into the man’s world of pub, club and beerhouse that examines drinking habits covering a century and more. Currently, historians view enduring changes in women’s drinking habits as a product of the last half of the twentieth century. Our present understanding of women’s drinking in the first half of the century is based on uncertain assumptions and limited statistical evidence. Scholars have ignored critical differences between pubs and beerhouses which shaped drinking habits. In estimating the proportion of women frequenting interwar licensed premises, scholars rely heavily on statistics from York, Bolton and London without scrutinizing their validity. Overlooking the lounge, a gender-neutral room introduced into interwar improved pubs, likewise creates misunderstanding. Women first began entering drink premises during World War I, and Progressive brewers protected and enlarged their numbers building or rebuilding reformed pubs with wider amenities, interiors without partitions and the lounge as a separate room. New drinking norms reinforced the image of middle-class restraint and respectability. Wine bars targeting professional women appeared from the mid-1970s, but women remained uninterested in drinking beer or frequenting pubs save for the decade from the mid-1980s to mid-1990s. Domestic drinking, already popular, soared from 1990 and reached nearly half of total sales. Women’s public drinking habits were revolutionized in the last quarter of the twentieth century. Female-friendly chains, style bars, clubs and wine bars gave women greater choices than traditional masculine boozers, which steadily contracted in numbers. Wine selections widened, notably from the New World, food became common and gay bars multiplied.

Work camps in Britain, 1880–1940
Author: John Field

The book provides a comprehensive account of work camp movements in Britain before 1939, based on thorough archival research, and on the reminiscences of participants. It starts with their origins in the labour colony movement of the 1880s, and examines the subsequent fate of labour colonies for the unemployed, and their broadening out as disciplined and closed therapeutic communities for such groups as alcoholics, epileptics, tuberculosis sufferers and the ‘feeble-minded’. It goes on to examine utopian colonies, inspired by anarchist, socialist and feminist ideas, and designed to develop the skills and resources needed for a new world. After the Great War, unemployed camps increasingly focused on training for emigration, a movement inspired by notions of a global British national identity, as well as marked by sharp gender divisions. The gender divisions were further enhanced after 1929, when the world economic crisis closed down options for male emigration. A number of anti-industrial movements developed work camps, inspired by pacifist, nationalist or communitarian ideals. Meanwhile, government turned increasingly to work camps as a way of training unemployed men through heavy manual labour. Women by contrast were provided with a domesticating form of training, designed to prepare them for a life in domestic service. The book argues that work camps can be understood primarily as instrumental communities, concerned with reshaping the male body, and reasserting particularistic male identities, while achieving broad social policy and economic policy goals.

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Oversized male bodies in recent Spanish cinema
Santiago Fouz-Hernández

a lot of weight, for instance, Christian Bale for The Machinist (Brad Anderson, 2004). There are also short cuts –​Eddie Murphy wore a fat suit for The Nutty Professor (Tom Shadyac, 1996) and its sequel (Peter Segal, 2000). The field of Fat Studies has gained critical momentum in recent years, and its impact on Film Studies is becoming increasingly evident. Yet, fat bodies are rarely discussed in the context of masculinities and Men’s Studies. In Fat Boys, a pioneering book-​length study on representations of fat men in art, literature and popular culture, Sander

in Performance and Spanish film
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Soft stardom, melodrama and the critique of epic masculinity in Ben-Hur (2016)
Thomas J. West III

-Hur, denied the presence of such larger-than-life male stars, opted instead to rely on the kinetic thrills provided by CGI. If Huston is such a lacklustre star, missing any of the stamina that usually accompanies such figures, why then does Gleiberman (and others) spend so much time focusing on him? I suggest that the relentless focus on Huston’s masculinity – or lack thereof – reveals a great deal about twenty-first-century expectations of male epic heroes and the types of stars chosen to play them. Gleiberman et al.’s critiques of Huston’s failed star turn reveal just as

in The Bible onscreen in the new millennium
Open Access (free)
Cultural identity and change in the Atlantic archipelago

The concept of 'margins' denotes geographical, economic, demographic, cultural and political positioning in relation to a perceived centre. This book aims to question the term 'marginal' itself, to hear the voices talking 'across' borders and not only to or through an English centre. The first part of the book examines debates on the political and poetic choice of language, drawing attention to significant differences between the Irish and Scottish strategies. It includes a discussion of the complicated dynamic of woman and nation by Aileen Christianson, which explores the work of twentieth-century Scottish and Irish women writers. The book also explores masculinities in both English and Scottish writing from Berthold Schoene, which deploys sexual difference as a means of testing postcolonial theorizing. A different perspective on the notion of marginality is offered by addressing 'Englishness' in relation to 'migrant' writing in prose concerned with India and England after Independence. The second part of the book focuses on a wide range of new poetry to question simplified margin/centre relations. It discusses a historicising perspective on the work of cultural studies and its responses to the relationship between ethnicity and second-generation Irish musicians from Sean Campbell. The comparison of contemporary Irish and Scottish fiction which identifies similarities and differences in recent developments is also considered. In each instance the writers take on the task of examining and assessing points of connection and diversity across a particular body of work, while moving away from contrasts which focus on an English 'norm'.

Editor: Robert Fish

Staging an encounter between cinema and countryside is to invoke a rich and diverse spatial imagery. This book explores the reciprocal relationship between film and the rural: how film makes rural and rural makes film. Part I of the book explores the idea of the nationhood and relatedly, how cinematic countrysides frame the occupancy and experience of border zones. It covers representations of the Australian landscape and the spatial imagery behind the 'inculcation of political ideology' of North Korean films. European 'films of voyage' are a cinematic tradition that articulates representations of the countryside with questions of boundaries and cultural diversity. The 'pagan' landscape of British cinema and the American and British war films are also discussed. Part II focuses on the role that countrysides play in mediating national self-image through globalising systems of cinematic production. Films such as The Local Hero and The Lord of the Rings, the latter in the context of New Zealand as a shooting location, are discussed. The third part of the book focuses on two key markers of social identity and difference - 'childhood' and 'masculinity' - which serve to amplify how embodied identities come to inflect the idea of rural space. A family's relocation to the countryside from the city serves to emphasise that they are isolated from the moral structures that might contain their deviant behaviour. Part IV of the book deals with, inter alia, the Amber Film and Photography Collective, and amateur films on the former coalfields of Durham.

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Jason Statham: star!

This book offers an investigative analysis into the post-millennium rise to global stardom of British actor, Jason Statham.

It presents original ideas focusing on new notions about film and cult actor stardom and celebrity. Using in-depth analysis of Statham’s work across a range of multimedia platforms, including chapters dedicated to his film, pop promo, videogaming and tabloid persona, each essay will present this British actor as a postmodern phenomenon in a quickly changing media world.

Chapters include: new ideas about the reframing of post-millennial British film masculinity; Statham as an anti-hero; his videogaming work; investigations into his art films; the music of Crank; Statham’s clothes in his modelling, pop promo and film work; work across a variety of genres; his ensemble approach in The Expendables, and how he ages in that franchise; and a personal essay from Statham’s director of Spy – Paul Feig.

The book is written in a fluid and approachable style but would be of particular benefit to students of film, stardom, celebrity, gender and social studies. Its approach will also appeal to the general member of the public and fan of Jason Statham.

Contributors include Professor Robert Shail (Stanley Baker and Children’s Film Foundation) Professor James Chapman (James Bond), Dr Steven Gerrard (Modern British Horror and the Carry On films) and Hollywood film director Paul Feig.