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Angela McCarthy

Ena Hughes by Bronwyn Hughes, recorded 1987, in OHC NLA, NSW Bicentennial Oral History Project, Oral TRC 2279/8. 36 Personal narratives of Irish and Scottish migration Brownyn Hughes: Because your elder brother would have gone to live with this uncle? Ena Hughes: Well, it would have to have been to disappear with him, you see, to Australia. So we packed up. I can remember an auction, selling all the stuff in the house and father didn’t get the price he wanted for the farm so he left it behind, let, let it, and off we came to Australia. Bronwyn Hughes: Now that

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Introduction

Mapping the contours of the British World

Series:

Kent Fedorowich and Andrew S. Thompson

settlers, indentured migrants and indigenous peoples, are increasingly regarded as fundamental to the world made by modern empires. In particular, the recent literature on the relationship between globalisation and empire underscores the importance of emigration to racial thinking and the ‘imperial imaginary’; the profound impact of migration cycles upon the development of settler societies and economies

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Series:

Kent Fedorowich

problems of demobilisation, veterans’ discontent, industrial regeneration and chronic unemployment. Moreover, the failure of the British government to launch a successful domestic colonisation scheme also had a direct bearing on the implementation of this empire migration project. The outbreak of war effectively ended imperial migration for the next five years. ‘Of course everything here is all war and

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Caitriona Clear

4883 Social Change PT bjl.qxd 1111 2 3 4 15 6 7 8 9 10 1 112 1113 4 5 6 7 8 9 20 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 40111 13/6/07 11:07 Page 57 4 Emigration and migration They went across the fields at six o’clock this morning, they are in America long ago. (Tipperary boy, 1890s, asked about his sisters1) How many and where? The alarming figures have been so often repeated that we are in danger of taking them for granted: in 1890 there were 3 million Irish people living outside of Ireland and 40 per cent of all Irish-bybirth people in the world were

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Angela McCarthy

Conclusion This study has focused upon two groups of migrants, the Irish and the Scots, concentrating upon the important period 1921 to 1965, an era illuminated in rich detail by the types of sources utilised, particularly interviews. The book has tried also to engage with migration streams across the diversity of the Anglophone world, drawing upon the experiences of both Scottish and Irish migrants who went to the United States, Canada, New Zealand, and Australia. The study has revealed that a close reading of personal testimonies can expose assorted

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Mary Gilmartin

4 Social connections This chapter focuses on social connections: on the ways in which people create, maintain and extend their social connections through the experience of migration. Migration is a social experience. When academics and others attempt to make sense of migration, they often frame it in social terms. Phrases that are regularly used in the context of migration include social group, social identity, social cohesion, social capital, social networks, social bonds, social bridges, social exclusion, social inequality and social change. Each of these ways

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Series:

Julian M. Simpson

93 3 The empire of the mind and medical migration It is important, in order to understand how the NHS and British general practice were able to draw on the labour of South Asian doctors, to appreciate, as was shown in the previous chapter, how British immigration and medical registration policies remained defined by imperial legacies for much of this period. It is also crucial to appreciate that these legacies continued to shape medicine in the Indian subcontinent and the thought processes of doctors—​as is apparent in their oral history interviews and in

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Tony Kushner

Introduction From the mid-nineteenth century through to the First World War, the Jewish world was re-shaped by mass migration resulting from a combination of factors – demographic and economic as well as the impact of persecution and discrimination. It was a part of a wider global shift in population from south to north and east to west that reflected the (uneven) impact of a new economic age and the forces of modernity that accompanied it. It is, however, especially the movement of

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Series:

Eric Richards

world is now generally discounted. Yet there were certainly regions in each of the home countries which were caught in severely negative conditions and where labour supply outran the long-term possibilities of employment. The efficacy of migration as a means of relief, in terms of Malthusian doctrine, is the central issue in this essay. Malthus offered a surprisingly wide range of propositions on the

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Series:

Anne Ring Petersen

2 The politics of identity and recognition in the ‘global art world’ Identity politics informed by postcolonial critique dominated the discourses on the interrelations of globalisation, migration and contemporary art in the 1990s and the early 2000s. The previous chapter characterised the position from which the struggle for recognition of non-Western artists was launched, designating it the postcolonial position, in contradistinction to the migratory aesthetics position that gathered momentum in the 2000s. This second chapter examines the historical role and