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The case for practice theory
Matthew Hanchard

Situationist 156 Stitching memories movements (Rasmussen, 2004); and second, through theoretical critique of the power relations between map content and spatial knowledge(s). On the latter, key moments include Harley and Woodward’s History of Cartography (Andrews, 2001) – a massively ambitious (and on-going) project, intended to redress subaltern dynamics within map representation (Harley, 1987). In drawing on Harley’s combination of post-structuralism, semiotics and social constructionism, the project sought to critique knowledge-politics in map representation (1988a

in Time for mapping
Young people in migrant worker families in Ireland
Naomi Tyrrell

in Ireland has received attention in political circles and in the popular press due to a number of ‘moral panics’ concerning children’s education and socialisation (Ní Laoire et al., 2009) and, more recently, the economic recession. In times of economic uncertainty, immigration often is perceived as a threat and of concern to society. Recent research by Spencer, Ruhs, Anderson and Rogaly (2007) in a UK context suggests that migrant workers who migrate with children are more likely to intend to remain living in their host country, specifically because they are more

in Spacing Ireland
100 years of Ireland in National Geographic magazine
Patrick J. Duffy

making damask, fine nylon, Dacron and other synthetic fabrics, along with new industrial estates and advance factories primed for a whole range of foreign investment. However, ominously, Harland and Wolff ’s shipbuilding had laid off half its 20,000 workforce, and the unbalanced political representation in the province was a cause for concern: nationalists ‘remain aloof. Most go to their own parochial schools; most favor [sic] reunification with southern Ireland, which the British Protestant community in Ulster vehemently opposes’ (Conly, August 1964: 267). The Aran

in Spacing Ireland
Open Access (free)
Mapping times
Alex Gekker, Sam Hind, Sybille Lammes, Chris Perkins and Clancy Wilmott

political and social positions, but interestingly temporality was only rarely explored by critical thinkers focusing on mapping. Further, radical rethinking of space-time and time-space from the position of animating the construct (see Merriman, 2011) underplays the implications of digital mapping for temporality: a point we return to in the conclusion to this chapter. For the moment though, it is safe to argue that few attempts have been made to resolve the paradoxes of this spatio-temporal dualism from the perspective of the digital aspect of digital maps. As previously

in Time for mapping
Stuart Hodkinson

1 Privatisation and the death of public housing In the emotional aftermath of the Grenfell Tower fire, some commentators from across the political spectrum were quick to paint the disaster as the ultimate failure of post-war public housing rather than a result of decades of neoliberal policies promoting private greed over safety. Simon Jenkins of the Guardian saw in Grenfell a salutary reminder of the more general failure of high-rise housing: ‘How many times should we say it? Don’t build residential towers…. They are antisocial, high

in Safe as houses
Stuart Hodkinson

financially penalise their PFI partners is heavily constrained by financial, informational and political barriers. The teams are usually made up of just two or three officers, supported periodically by an external consultant. Such an expansive role for so few people means that the council’s contract monitoring approach is mainly superficial, with very specific investigations from time to time. As Lambeth’s designated PFI contractor performance monitoring officer told MFN residents in June 2013: I don’t monitor the contract. I don’t monitor the KPIs.… The contractor monitors

in Safe as houses
The case of Ortobello Urban Garden
Giuseppe Aliperti and Silvia Sarti

the territorial dimension of urban politics (O’Laughlin, 1973; Pirie, 1983; Reynaud, 1981; Soja, 2009). In early 1980s, the interest in investigating spatial justice considerably increased and scholars actively approached the topic. The term spatial justice became almost exclusively associated with the work of geographers and planners in Los Angeles (Soja, 2009). Los Angeles was the most important metropolitan region in the United States considering the production of unjust geographies and spatial structures of privileges. These characteristics have played a

in Urban gardening and the struggle for social and spatial justice
Derek Gladwin

4 Documentary map-making and film-making in Pat Collins’s Tim Robinson: Connemara Derek Gladwin A map is a sustained attempt upon an unattainable goal, the complete comprehension by an individual of a tract of space that will be individualized into a place by that attempt.1 – Tim Robinson In sum a film is a map, and … its symbolic and political effectiveness is a function of its identity as a cartographic diagram.2 – Tom Conley Documenting through map-making and film-making In the documentary film Tim Robinson: Connemara (2011), director Pat Collins spotlights

in Unfolding Irish landscapes
Open Access (free)
Digital photography and cartography in Wolfgang Weileder’s Atlas
Rachel Wells

a conception of experience across a space of time’ that was a reaction to the contemporary destruction of space at the hands of increased speed (Harvey, 1989: 267). Harvey diagnoses this capitalist-fuelled modernist transformation in the relationship between time and space as ‘time-space compression’, and notes that the second, intensive round of it emerged with postmodernism (Harvey, 1989: 283). This latest period of the ‘time-space compression’ is identified by Harvey as ‘an intense phase’ that has had a ‘disorienting and disruptive impact upon political

in Time for mapping
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Critically evaluating the role of the Incredible Edible movement in the UK
Michael Hardman, Mags Adams, Melissa Barker and Luke Beesley

worldwide. From the ‘trendy’ and relatively ‘soft’ intransigent political movements in North America and Europe, to those pursuing it for survival in Africa and other global South nations, the activity is very broad (Adams et  al., 2014; Reynolds, 2008). In the case of Africa, most of the UA practised across the continent could be viewed as guerrilla gardening, as city authorities and national governments often discourage the practice of UA (Chipungu et al., 2013). In a similar manner, residents of Havana, Cuba –​one of the most frequently cited exemplars of UA

in Urban gardening and the struggle for social and spatial justice