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Heike Wieters

), states tend to be careful not to grant international organizations too much autonomy and genuine influence on politics. 16 While this must not always be the case in practice, it was certainly true for UNRRA. After a phase of fairly successful cooperation and operational impact in the field of refugee relief, 17 impending Cold War tensions and diverging ideas about “internationalism” among its members

in The NGO CARE and food aid From America, 1945–80
Heike Wieters

lot of experience in all issues relating to public relations, lobbying, and fund-raising. CARE had acquired a remarkable reputation even among the highest ranks of political power. Most Presidents as well as their First Ladies were more than willing to provide press photos showing a check delivery to CARE for hungry children abroad on the steps of the White House. 42 The agency had definitely

in The NGO CARE and food aid From America, 1945–80
The structure of Islamic toleration
Jonathan Benthall

to press of his important monograph, Tolerance and Coercion in Islam: Interfaith relations in the Muslim tradition (Friedmann 2003 ). According to him, this is ‘not a book of political or social history and does not try to compare the treatment of religious minorities in various civilizations … It rather deals with the laws themselves … It is a book concerned with

in Islamic charities and Islamic humanism in troubled times
Abstract only
Jonathan Benthall

forward for Christian–Muslim understanding, both in his questioning of the doctrine of original sin and in his interpretation of Mary as a model for political activism on the basis of her words in the Magnificat: ‘[the Lord] has brought down the powerful from their thrones, and lifted up the lowly’ (Luke 1: 52). Such an interpretation would resonate on the one hand with

in Islamic charities and Islamic humanism in troubled times
Abstract only
Boim versus the Holy Land Foundation
Jonathan Benthall

terrorist entities on how to achieve their aims by peaceful means is a form of material support for terrorism. The ruling has been widely criticized in the American media as a threat to peace builders, from President Jimmy Carter down, and to journalists and academic researchers who set out to understand militant political groups. 2 An ethnography of the Supreme Court is clearly needed, though we have an

in Islamic charities and Islamic humanism in troubled times
Alexis Heraclides and Ada Dialla

April 1892 saw the formation of the Partido revolucionario cubano, by poet and political theorist José Martí, who recruited seasoned soldiers from the previous war, Gómez, Maceo, García and others. On 24 February 1895 the Guerra de independencia was declared. Martí issued the Proclamation of Montecristi (25 March), which stated that the struggle was also for liberation from economic oppression and racial discrimination. Martí together with Gómez arrived in Cuba on 11 April

in Humanitarian intervention in the long nineteenth century
Heike Wieters

regarding CARE and expressed the conviction that packages were sent primarily to help, not for political reasons or out of a “profit motive.” 4 While CARE’s success and its popularity in Europe are explained rather easily by the fact that surplus American food was ending up in European casseroles, an explanation for CARE’s success in the United States – which was of course the basis for

in The NGO CARE and food aid From America, 1945–80
Charlotte Heath-Kelly

In the introductory chapter , I outlined a sketch of the ways we might think of security as the protection of sovereignty through the effacement of mortality and death. Using insights from Agamben, Aries, Heidegger, Camus, Sartre, Sloterdijk and Bauman, I showed how mortality disturbs the rationalist and modernist edifice of political sovereignty. Security was then postulated as one of many methods

in Death and security
Between humanitarianism and pragmatism
Alexis Heraclides and Ada Dialla

for the Russian Empire. Most Russian diplomats and other high-ranking officials, most of them aristocrats, though not immune to the ideological, political and cultural differences within Russian society, were attuned to the reigning spirit and culture of Europe. Thus they upheld the concept of legitimacy, diplomatic dialogue and limited war as a last resort in order to resolve outstanding conflicts that could not be settled by concord. 2 Despite the overall Russian

in Humanitarian intervention in the long nineteenth century
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Security, mobility, liberals, and Christians
Luis Lobo-Guerrero

and Vaughan-Williams 2008 ). By the time he began to think about the mobility elements that had made his journey so easy, he was already falling asleep. If he had kept awake, he would have had to think about the politics, logistics, and economics involved in international air travel (cf. Salter 2008 ), in planning cities, in designing, upgrading, and operating the urban transport systems so that

in Security/ Mobility