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Steve Sohmer

of politics, Shakespeare’s 5.6 has an elusive, almost existential quality. ‘Who’s there?’ is the question of identity which haunts both Faulconbridge and Prince Hamlet. Shakespeare, commencing work on the revision that became Hamlet Q2, remembered his memorial for Henry Carey in King John. The common question tying the two protagonists is legitimacy and the right to

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind
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From commentary on poetry to poetry as commentary
William John Kennedy

introduction by R.C. Simonini Jr (Gainesville: Scholars’ Facsimiles and Reprints, 1953). For Florio’s contribution to linguistic study, see M. Wyatt, The Italian Encounter with Tudor England: A Cultural Politics of Translation (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005), pp. 157–204. 9

in The early modern English sonnet
Sidney’s literary rebirth
Elisabeth Chaghafi

– contrary to what the invocations to Mars are trying to imply, Sidney only spent a relatively short period of his life as a soldier – it corresponds to the prominent military imagery of Lant’s Roll. Minerva, on the other hand, is used by the commemorative poems to call to mind Sidney’s life as a significant political figure. This too may not fully correspond to Sidney’s importance at the English court (though Alan Stewart has made a strong case for Sidney as a key figure at other European courts), but once again it corresponds perfectly to the

in English literary afterlives
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The Faerie Queene III–IV
Victoria Coldham-Fussell

(esp. pp. 120 – 1 ); Lawrence F. Rhu , ‘ Romancing Eliza: The Political Decorum of Ariostan Imitation in The Faerie Queene ’, Renaissance Papers ( 1993 ), 31 – 9 ; Peter DeSa Wiggens , ‘ Spenser’s Use of Ariosto: Imitation and Allusion in Book I of The Faerie Queene ’, RQ , 44 ( 1991 ), 257 – 79 . 5 For critical recognition of Spenser’s affinity to Ariosto, see n. 16 below. 6 Such irony is well recognised in the Amoretti ; see Louis L. Martz , ‘ The Amoretti : “Most Goodly Temperature” ’, in Form and Convention in the Poetry of Edmund

in Comic Spenser
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Spenser, Donne, and the philosophic poem
Yulia Ryzhik

this great divide – which incidentally also separates Shakespeare’s comedies and ‘problem plays’ from the tragedies, or Jonson’s comic drama from his masques and poems – reinforces a narrative of rupture and disconnection as the primal scene for the emergence of a modern literary voice concerned with questions of subjectivity, political and religious self-determination, philosophical scepticism and self-conscious irony. It is no accident, of course, that this historical narrative is replicated in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries: where T.S. Eliot identified a

in Spenser and Donne
Steve Sohmer

’s monarchial yoke. Within the Roman tradition, Ovid’s Amores and Lucan’s Civil War were definitive testaments to erotic and political freedom.’ Riggs, The World , 187. 77 Hattaway, As You Like It , 1. 78 In Henry

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind
Elisabeth Chaghafi

write a Robin Hood play for performance at court and ends up playing the part of Friar Tuck himself. Unfortunately, Skelton’s performance in the Robin Hood play is hampered by the fact that he is not an actor but a poet, so he frequently ‘forgets himself’ and slips out of character and into Skeltonics. 3 This particularly applies to the play Sir Thomas More , which presents the tensions between More’s political office and his ‘poetic’ nature as the central conflict of his life. 4 For a detailed account of the

in English literary afterlives
Greg Wells

This is the edition of John Hall’s medical casebook itself. This is the first complete English translation of the medical casebook of John Hall, Shakespeare’s son-in-law. Greg Wells has produced a groundbreaking new study which significantly refocuses our attention on Hall’s scholarship, as well as his compassion. Hall’s community of patients, their illnesses and his treatments are all authoritatively represented. But so too is Hall’s own library. In looking again at Hall’s Latin manuscript, Wells has been able to identify Hall’s many borrowings from other medical textbooks, thereby offering a unique insight into the intellectual climate of early seventeenth-century Stratford-upon-Avon.

in John Hall, Master of Physicke
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Richard Hillman

-inspired series of pastoral romances in prose (as usual, interspersed with verse) by Nicholas de Montreux known as the Bergeries de Juliette , of which an English version appeared in 1610, without acknowledgement of the author. 11 The same author, working in a different, though closely related medium, is my subject here. Montreux, whose anagrammatic nom de plume was Ollenix du Mont-Sacré, was an enormously prolific, and politically engaged, man of letters (and priest), who, through most of the 1590s, served as cultural factotum to the Governor of Brittany, the Duke of

in The Shakespearean comic and tragicomic
Legacies and departures
Editor: Janet Clare

This volume challenges a traditional period divide of 1660, exploring continuities with the decades of civil war, the Republic and Restoration and shedding new light on religious, political and cultural conditions before and after the restoration of church and monarchy. The volume marks a significant development in transdisciplinary studies, including, as it does, chapters on political theory, religion, poetry, pamphlets, theatre, opera, portraiture, scientific experiment and philosophy. Chapters show how unresolved issues at national and local level, residual republicanism and religious dissent, were evident in many areas of Restoration life, and recorded in plots against the regime, memoirs, diaries, historical writing, pamphlets and poems. An active promotion of forgetting, the erasing of memories of the Republic and the reconstruction of the old order did not mend the political, religious and cultural divisions that had opened up during the civil wars. In examining such diverse genres as women’s writing, the prayer book, prophetic writings, the publications of the Royal Society, histories of the civil wars by Clarendon and Hobbes, the poetry and prose of Milton and Marvell, plays and opera, court portraiture and political cartoons the volume substantiates its central claim that the Restoration was conditioned by continuity and adaptation of linguistic and artistic discourses.