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Peter Marks

film demonstrates graphically how resistance is brutally crushed in such an environment. Baccolini and Moylan make two other points about critical dystopias that we can apply to Brazil , arguing that ‘the typical dystopian text is an exercise in a politically charged form of hybrid textuality’. 13 This study argues that all Gilliam’s films are exercises in hybrid textuality, but the dystopian

in Terry Gilliam
Monstrous becomings in Abel Ferrara’s Body Snatchers
Jay McRoy

recuperates, albeit tenuously, a modernist politics of cohesion. As the film’s teenage heroine and narrator, Marti Malone (Gabrielle Anwar), asserts while the helicopter in which she is riding destroys a convoy of supposedly pod-laden military transport vehicles, ‘In the end, it had to happen . . . our reaction was only human.’ Produced during the forty-plus years of capitalist panic known as the Cold War, 1

in Monstrous adaptations
Recursive and self-reflexive patterns in David Cronenberg’s Videodrome and eXistenZ
Steffen Hantke

‘Become your enemy’. In the closing scene of the film, Cronenberg focuses on questions about the conditions and possibilities of political action in the context of celebrity culture. What makes Geller, and her ‘real-life’ equivalent Yevgeni Nourish, targets of the opposing side and its assassins are their public visibility, their status as celebrities. Two groups function as opponents: inside the

in Monstrous adaptations
National identity and the spirit of subaltern vengeance in Nakata Hideo’s Ringu and Gore Verbinski’s The Ring
Linnie Blake

Iwo Jima (1949) or Halls of Montezuma (1951) revisiting the Pacific War for explicitly nationalitistic purposes, asserting the superiority of US modes of social and political organisation in the face of the deindividuated alterity of the ruthless Japanese threat. It is similarly visible in more socially liberal and ostensibly anti-racist offerings of the Cold War, such as Joshua Logan’s Sayonara

in Monstrous adaptations
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Jonathan Rayner

The AFC genre The role of these films as quasi-official representatives of, rather than representations of, the nation did endow the industry with cultural and political legitimacy during those early difficult years. The institutional commitment to the cultural flagship may well have cushioned film producers from some of the commercial consequences of their judgements at a time when the commercial consequences were particularly harsh … [period films] possessed attributes which were the reverse of those

in Contemporary Australian cinema
Horror and generic hybridity
Andy W. Smith

? The politics of terror The generic components of cinematic horror tend to focus around four key areas: audience identification; sensual gratification; the build up of suspense (usually through performance, cinematography and sound); and, finally, the release of primal fears through the explication of the monster. Its tradition is drawn from a wide range of historical and

in Monstrous adaptations
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Jonathan Rayner

The nationalities of cinema The acceleration of abstraction, while it is certainly the main factor evident in the historical development of the arts during the twentieth century, is not the only one. The force that counters this estheticism[sic] is our continuing sense of the political dimension of the arts: that is, their direct connection to the community, and their power to explain the structure of society to us. 1 The analysis and discussion of a national cinema represents the pursuit of

in Contemporary Australian cinema
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Jonathan Rayner

corruption and injustice in Shame, and Max the young cop becomes divorced from society and family in the vain battle against encroaching anarchy). The enumeration of such differences can be extended even further, when one takes into account the debt to Hitchcock (in The Plumber (Peter Weir, 1978)) and to the political/investigative thriller ( Heatwave (Phillip Noyce, 1981), Deadly (Esben Storm, 1990)). Instead of a genre. Australian Gothic represents a mode, a stance and an atmosphere, after the fashion of American Film

in Contemporary Australian cinema
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Gothic conspiracy and the eyes of Lara Means
Julia M. Wright

Hellenic “powers-that-be,” draws on the gothic trope of conspiracy in its final two, breakneck-speed episodes by revealing that a secret society of supernatural entities, “The Circle of the Black Thorn,” has been controlling commerce, politics, and other social engines. As these series unravel masculinity and patriarchy, their arc narratives turn to the old gothic trope of religious conspiracy and the

in Men with stakes
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Peter Marks

your vision.’ 14 Much of this can be applied to Gilliam, and he also left America for broadly political reasons. But his dissatisfaction in the 1960s mirrored the views of many of his generation, and he left America on his own terms, rather than under political pressure. Gilliam could and did return to make films in America. In Said’s terms he was a critical expatriate rather than an exile. 15 But Gilliam’s defence

in Terry Gilliam