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The external image of Germany’s foreign policy

international order in Europe and the US. The catastrophic consequences of Nazism, the Second World War and the Holocaust led to a fundamental recasting of Germany’s identity in the world. (West) Germany adopted a different approach to foreign policy, underpinned by democratic values as well as new foreign policy practices, such as multilateralism, European integration and military restraint. The resulting strategic culture of the country’s foreign policy role is built around three central tenets: ‘never again’, ‘never alone’ and ‘politics before force’. 2 According to this

in Prussians, Nazis and Peaceniks

violence. This development presents an enormous political and socio-economic challenge for many African countries and organizations, which are already overburdened trying to cope with a whole host of new and diverse security threats besides terrorism. Moreover, this lack of state and institutional capacity is at times further overshadowed by an African wariness and lack of political will over what some see as an imported problem. Their fear is that the continent is once again becoming a battlefield for an ideological clash of civilizations not of Africa’s own making

in African security in the twenty-first century
Policy rethinking in opposition

that not only did David Cameron feel compelled to back Labour’s pledges on aid spending but his first Secretary of State for International Development, Andrew Mitchell, claimed that international development policy had moved beyond party politics (Glennie, 2012 ). Labour’s policy effort in government was not without its problems and tensions, and has been the subject of a substantial literature. 1 However, in opposition, and in a markedly different domestic and international climate, Labour had to rethink its approach. How Labour’s policy

in Britain and Africa in the twenty-first century
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Andrew Williams

-referential, in the process drawing on an ever smaller number of (usually American) gurus who have little regard for the longer-term currents of world history, even within their own culture. Yet the older traditions of international relations’ political and intellectual history are far too precious to be left to moulder away on the shelves of libraries. If this book has one good effect it will be to take the strain off borrowings of international relations theorists of the 1970s and 1980s and to put it back on to, especially, those writing between the 1920s and the 1940s. But

in Failed imagination?
Twentieth-century Germany in the debates of Anglo-American international lawyers and transitional justice experts

twentieth century. Though being deeply complicit in the racist ideologies and practices of European imperialism, its followers also promoted a ‘progressive’ or ‘scientific’ understanding of law as opposed to politics, and the idea of a ‘global humanity’ with common moral standards, shared by a transnational community of experts and enlightened citizens. Due to the various ‘cultural turns’ in law and political sciences, critical assessment of international law’s ideological roots and baggage has become the state of the art in legal historiography. Thanks to the studies

in Prussians, Nazis and Peaceniks
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the general public – that particular policy areas are legitimate security concerns and therefore require special attention, oversight, and control. Beginning with the religion law of 1997, and progressing through laws on social organisations, political parties, extremists, migration, foreigners, the media, and political demonstrations, the Russian state has tightened up its control of civil society in recent years. In most of these cases there are sufficient regulations for the state to move with a clear legal basis against groups or individuals which might be

in Securitising Russia
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MUP FINAL PROOF – <STAGE>, 08/19/2013, SPi Concluding remarks Reflections on Israeli policies Israeli policies of population management, surveillance and political control described in this book had not been entirely known before. Scholars who previously wrote on state–minority relations were largely guessing in the dark; thus, their assumptions and biases might have found their ways to the models or narratives they composed. Two widely held theses in Israeli social sciences were disproved in the current study: the absence of a clear state policy towards the

in Thorough surveillance

means that empower people and societies through political, social, and economic development and build long-term security for all. The changing (and changeless) face of engagement Foreign powers, international organizations, and individuals have been drawn to Africa for centuries. From the colonial period to independence and throughout the Cold War and beyond, external actors have been instrumental in defining not only the nature of African security, but also in determining the continent’s security agenda. Security during the colonial period, as we have seen, was

in African security in the twenty-first century
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MUP REVISED PROOF – <STAGE>, 08/20/2013, SPi 4 Divide et impera Categorizing citizens In chapter 2, following Michel Foucault, I argued that an overriding concern of Israel, like all modern states, is the population (bio-politics), although the population at the centre of Israel’s concern overlaps neither with those who live within its boundaries nor with those holding its citizenship (see chapters 1 and 2). Nevertheless, it has been energetically engaged since its inception in the collection of data – its storage, classification and categorization – according

in Thorough surveillance

the securitisation approach, it does not come as a surprise that the military intervention in Chechnya in 1999 was initially conveyed discursively in strongly securitised language. After all, the advocating and use of military means to counter a security threat is the epitome of asserting that an issue belongs in the security realm and disregarding the procedures of ‘normal politics’. However, the analysis in this chapter of the events in Chechnya through the prism of the securitisation framework advocated in this book serves an important purpose. First, a study of

in Securitising Russia