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Caroline Turner and Jen Webb

engage the ‘truth’, or the affectual part of human society, and in this way has a heightened ability to juxtapose fact and truth, and imbue viewers with new understandings  – new ‘truths’. Maurice Blanchot writes that ‘art is useless, even to itself ’,11 but he refers here not to fact, but to truth – to the feeling in society that art is not capable of engaging with the great forces of politics and economics. Jacques Rancière, however, makes the point that art ‘is a way of doing and making that intervenes in the general distribution of ways of doing and making as well

in Art and human rights
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The echoes of Rome in Julius Caesar
Richard Wilson

ought not walk, Upon a labouring day without the sign Of your profession? [ 1,1,2–5 ] Why do intellectuals make so much of shoemakers? asks Jacques Rancière. The answer he gives in The Philosopher and His Poor is that the shoemaker figures as the archetypal artisan, who because his work never advances beyond mere

in Free Will
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The visual turn in Antony and Cleopatra
Richard Wilson

was thus the fulfilment of what Shakespeare’s Caesar has in mind, and Jacques Rancière describes in The Emancipated Spectator as a Platonist theatre to end theatre : Plato wanted to replace the democratic, ignorant community of theatre with a different … choreographic community where everyone must move in

in Free Will
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Martin O’Shaughnessy

two of the most important French intellectuals of recent times, Pierre Bourdieu and Jacques Rancière. The former’s work, as expressed in his writings on education and especially on social distinction, is often cited to explain how, having internalised social Early applications  39 subordination, the dominated not only struggle to challenge it but become inadvertently complicit in it. The notion of habitus is central to this understanding. Habitus, as deployed by Bourdieu, is used to describe the acquired sensibilities, judgements and dispositions through which

in Laurent Cantet
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Richard Wilson

one of symbolic representation. At the same time, I suggest, Shakespeare’s human comedy ‘bodies forth’ [ Dream, 5,1,14 ] all the twists of presence and representation traced by theorists such as Jacques Rancière. For while an author may rejoice that ‘the free breath of a sacred king’ [ John, 3,1,74 ] has but ‘a little scene, / To monarchize’ [ Richard II, 3

in Free Will
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Belonging
Alpesh Kantilal Patel

Aesthetics, 36. 5 Ibid. 6 Ibid., 2. She further summarizes briefly other major scholars and how they have approached ‘aesthetics’. She writes that philosopher ‘Jacques Rancière reconfigures the aesthetic as the site for the systematic ordering of sense experience … which in turn establishes the political function of the aesthetic’; and that many media theorists (drawing on thinkers such as Deleuze and Guattari) have ‘shifted the terms of aesthetic analysis to focus on media dynamics, affect and perception’. 7 Ibid., 1. See Alexander Gottlieb Baumgarten, Aesthetica

in Productive failure
Reconfigurations of twenty-first-century audiences
Liz Tomlin

emancipated spectator’, Jacques Rancière moves beyond the more familiar historical narrative outlined by Freshwater and Bennett to trace the charge of audience passivity all the way back to Plato, arguing that Plato’s anti-theatrical prejudice was underpinned by his vilification of the spectator. Rancière summarises Plato’s objections as follows: Being a spectator means looking at a spectacle. And looking is a bad thing, for two reasons. First, looking is deemed the opposite of knowing. It means standing before an appearance without knowing the conditions which produced

in Acts and apparitions
Caroline Turner and Jen Webb

Better”:  Art and Human Rights in Unaustralia’, Continuum 21.4 (2007), pp. 541–53: 551. 56 Christine Chinkin, ‘The Language of Human Rights Law’, p. 14. See also Caroline Turner, ‘Art and Images’, in David P. Forsythe (ed.), Encylopedia of Human Rights, Volume 1 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009), pp. 104–13. 57 Jacques Rancière, The Philosopher and his Poor, trans. John Drury, Corinne Oster and Andrew Parker (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2004 [1983]). 58 Michael Godby (ed.), William Kentridge: Drawings for Projection: Four Animated Films (Sandton

in Art and human rights
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John Corner

, such as Jacques Ranciere’s broad-ranging examination of contemporary aesthetics and spectatorship in relation to the notion of emancipation (Ranciere, 2009) can inform analysis of a more specific kind, embedding data and questions within frameworks of power and processes of subjectivity. Form is a central if often taken-for-granted component of our media satisfactions and of the benefits derived from their activities. Issues of form are also a part of the continuing anxieties about at least some of what the media produce and circulate and they inform the widespread

in Theorising Media
Thibaut Raboin

of human rights is epitomised by Hannah Arendt’s paradox that the loss of human rights happens at the very moment that the person becomes only human, that is without citizenship, profession, identity, etc. (Balfour and Cadava, 2004: 281); or, as Jacques Rancière describes it, ‘the rights of Man are the rights of those who are only human beings, who have no more property left than the property of being human’ (2004b: 298). One of the ways to think about the spectatorship of suffering involved in the narrativisation of asylum claims follows this paradox, and proposes

in Discourses on LGBT asylum in the UK