Heroes, heroines and ‘pioneers of progress’ in the teaching of history

is good citizenship’ he wrote in the preface to Wolf Patrol ) explains partly why he made it his personal responsibility to ensure that the nameless faces in urban run-down schools were aware of the nameless faces who had sacrificed themselves for the good of their country. 39 Not unsurprisingly, therefore, he devoted much space in one of his most popular historical reading

in Citizenship, Nation, Empire

5 History, citizenship and co-operative ­education, c. 1895–1930 Keith Vernon A strong sense of the past pervades the co-operative movement. With the origins of the modern movement traced back to 1844, discussions of the nature and principles of co-operation routinely return to their foundations in the grim industrial conditions of the hungry forties.1 Aspects of this historical culture have been analysed, primarily, through selected writings on the history of co-operation, such as those by G. J. Holyoake (see Yeo, chapter 4, this volume). The crop of jubilee

in Mainstreaming co-operation
National origins, seafaring and the Christian impulse

. 41 S.J. Heathorn, ‘ “Let Us Remember that We, Too, Are English”: Constructions of Citizenship and National Identity in English Elementary School Reading Books, 1880–1914’, Victorian Studies , 38:4 (1995), 395–427. 42 J. Meiklejohn, The British Empire: Its

in Citizenship, Nation, Empire
The rise of ‘suburban neurosis’?

4 Male leisure in the industrial suburb, 1918–39: the rise of ‘suburban neurosis’? I n 1919 a number of cities and towns across Britain were shaken by outbreaks of fierce civil unrest.1 Although the immediate causes for the disturbances varied, it had become abundantly clear to the local civic elite that the nineteenth-century vision of social citizenship lay in ruins. This failure was most apparent in the expanding cities in the Midlands and Southeast, which had witnessed some of the most vigorous attempts to implement schemes of social citizenship between

in Leisure, citizenship and working-class men in Britain, 1850–1945

awareness of citizenship with the dawning Rational recreation and the creation of the model citizen of a newly democratic age. Initially, enthusiasts of rational recreation set about attracting working-class males into bourgeois establishments to teach them, through a mixture of instruction and amusement, the political and economic laws and certainties of the day. Clearly, a ‘properly’ educated artisan would be first to qualify for the vote from the disenfranchised multitude. It will be argued, however, that rational recreation underwent a major shift in emphasis after

in Leisure, citizenship and working-class men in Britain, 1850–1945

4 Migration, cosmopolitanism and ‘global citizenship’ from the 1990s The quest for ‘lifestyle’ in two generations I exist now in a state of limbo. I’ve lived in New Zealand for nearly four years, which my Wellington friends assure me is no time at all. I still have an English accent and gravitate without intention to other English people. But I don’t feel English any more. I don’t read the English news or support England against New Zealand in sport. I knew more about the All Blacks than I did about the British Lions on their recent tour, but I’m still not a

in Migrants of the British diaspora since the 1960S

PART II Imperialism and citizenship These chapters foreground racial differentiation at the heart of colonialism, and the work of law(s), courts and legislatures, in defining a colonial population and in categorizing and excluding colonized populations from citizenship in specific localities.

in Law, history, colonialism
Abstract only

; Sivanandan 2006 ; Waldron 2003 ) have pointed, in contrast, to the pernicious implications of such measures for fundamental principles of democratic life, decrying those agitating for their sacrifice in a misguided quest for greater security. Why citizenship? Why security? For a book concerned with the development and experience of anti

in Anti-terrorism, citizenship and security
Abstract only

At the book’s outset, we identified four research questions underpinning our exploration of anti-terrorism powers, citizenship and security in the United Kingdom. First, how are contemporary anti-terrorism powers understood, assessed and discussed by different publics across the UK? Second, how do anti-terrorism powers affect the experience of citizenship within the UK

in Anti-terrorism, citizenship and security
Young and Phillips on equality

5 Opportunities, outcomes and democratic citizenship: Young and Phillips on equality Introduction: the hegemony of opportunity T W A S noted in Chapter 3 that liberal debates on equality increasingly concentrate on the ideal of equal opportunities for all individuals. There are, to be sure, different interpretations of equal opportunities: thus the luck egalitarian literature kick-started by Dworkin, in particular, attempts to replace the old meritocracy – the talent-based equality of opportunity which Rawls rejected – with a ‘new’ meritocracy where the effort

in Rethinking Equality