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Post-Cold War conflicts and the media
Philip Hammond

making sense of international conflict and cooperation. The first major post-Cold War conflict, the 1991 Gulf war, indicated how much had already changed. Saddam Hussein had enjoyed Western support in Iraq’s war against Iran in the 1980s, but was abruptly cast as the ‘new Hitler’ after his invasion of Kuwait in August 1990. Neither the erstwhile Soviet enemy nor Arab states raised any serious objections

in Framing post-Cold War conflicts
Michael Staunton

immediate eruption of conflict upon Thomas’s elevation to Canterbury, Herbert’s version is also guilty of distortion. He passes over the danger to the relationship between archbishop and king caused by Thomas’s claiming of royal castles and his antagonising of the king’s tenants-in-chief. The description of the council of Tours is highly selective

in The lives of Thomas Becket
Joseph Ruane

4147 Inglis–Are the Irish different_BB_Layout 1 29/07/2014 09:27 Page 166 16 Conflict and reconciliation in Northern Ireland Joseph Ruane On 2 December 2012 Belfast City Council decided by majority vote to cease flying the Union Jack over City Hall every day of the year and to fly it on just eighteen, designated days. The pressure for change came from the nationalist parties on the council, Sinn Fein and the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP), who had not wanted it flown at all. The agreement to fly it on designated days only was a compromise to secure

in Are the Irish different?
David Bolton

This chapter describes the establishment of a trauma-focused approach to the needs of those seeking help with emotional, psychological and mental health problems linked to traumatic experiences of the civil conflict in Northern Ireland. The chapter will outline the development of a therapy service based upon trauma-focused cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT). Key issues relating

in Conflict, peace and mental health
David Bolton

This chapter considers the benefits of, and an approach to, undertaking research as part of the task of a trauma centre. Ongoing research into the changing needs of communities affected by emergency or conflict is fundamental to informing policy, advocating for service development, supporting the needs-directed commissioning of services and training, and to developing practice

in Conflict, peace and mental health
Abstract only
Philip Hammond

Of the crises and conflicts considered in this book, Bosnia has generated the greatest controversy. There is even some disagreement over the date on which the war began: the Bosnian Serbs argue that it started on 1 March 1992, with the shooting of a guest at a Serbian wedding in Sarajevo; others maintain that it began with the recognition by the European Community (EC) of

in Framing post-Cold War conflicts
David Bolton

masters course on CBT, with a specialist module on the treatment of PTSD, was developed at Ulster University. This course was provided for four years. The impact of international experiences The experiences that staff from the Centre had in other countries affected by conflict played a key part in the thinking about how training could be developed. During a visit to

in Conflict, peace and mental health
Governmentality of participation and strategic veto in Bihar and Jharkhand, India
Amit Prakash

3 Political economy of conflict and peace: governmentality of participation and strategic veto in Bihar and Jharkhand, India Amit Prakash Mainstream governance literature is rooted in a technocratic approach to ‘resolving’ policy conundrums and has an uneasy approach to conflict. Conflict is seen as an aberration, which can and must be ‘resolved’ by construction of adequate policy responses to conflict. Embedded within this approach is a presumption that it is possible to create a system of governance in which the policy choices are limited to merely finding

in Cultures of governance and peace
Eşref Aksu

T HE CYPRUS CONFLICT , too, emerged out of a colonial context. In Cyprus, some 6,500 peacekeepers were deployed at a time when, as a result of the Congo experience, several international actors were sceptical of UN peacekeeping. 1 As of 2002, the Cyprus mission was still continuing. However, its nature had changed considerably since the Turkish intervention in 1974

in The United Nations, intra-state peacekeeping and normative change
Abstract only
Philip Hammond

The focus of this chapter is Operation Allied Force, the Nato air campaign against Yugoslavia from 24 March to 10 June 1999. Nato’s intervention was in response to ongoing conflict in the Serbian province of Kosovo and was triggered by the Yugoslav government’s failure to sign a peace agreement with representatives of Kosovo’s ethnic-Albanian majority. Nato’s declared aim

in Framing post-Cold War conflicts