‘the dead appear to live again’ and in the same process revive contemporary theological debates concerning the status of suffrage and repentance. In performance, the dislocationary potential of this phantom-like economy of remembrance is simultaneously disconcerting and regenerative, and, however unsettling it proves to be, the restoration of the past can result in a ‘newly

in Shakespeare’s histories and counter-histories

This essay announces the discovery of ten performances of Horace Walpole‘s five-act tragedy, The Mysterious Mother (1768) in May 1821 at The Surrey Theatre, St Georges Fields, London, then under the management of Thomas John Dibdin (1771–1841). It was produced as Narbonne Castle: Or, The Mysterious Mother and billed as founded on a Tragic Play written by the late HORACE WALPOLE, EARL OF ORFORD, and now presented for the FIRST TIME. It has long been assumed there was no public performance until the Glasgow Citizens Theatre production of 2001. The essay demonstrates theatre licensing conditions forced Dibdin to produce Narbonne Castle as a three-act, musicalized, redaction. With audiences totalling in excess of 16,000, its production raises many questions about contemporary attitudes to incest.

Gothic Studies
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Approaching performance in Spanish film

Introduction: approaching performance in Spanish film Dean Allbritton, Alejandro Melero and Tom Whittaker The importance of screen acting has often been overlooked in studies on Spanish film. While several critical works on Spanish cinema have centred on the cultural, social and industrial significance of stars, there has been relatively little critical scholarship on what stars are paid to do: act. This is perhaps surprising, given the central role that acting occupies within a film. In his essay ‘Why Study Film Acting?’, Paul McDonald argues that acting is not

in Performance and Spanish film
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Horror acting in the 1970s British television drama

(the Thriller DVD box-set totals 2150 minutes) with a variety of extra features. The ongoing release of 1970s television horror reflects three factors: the DVD industry continues to flourish and material is being released to meet this demand; there is a nostalgia industry surrounding 1970s culture; and performance horror enjoys a perennial popularity. With regard to the case studies in this chapter, there is a special place

in Genre and performance
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Gracita Morales

4 The voice of comedy: Gracita Morales Kathleen M. Vernon Recent scholarship on mid-​twentieth-​century Spanish cinema has witnessed a re-​evaluation of the comic performances and persona of a number of well-​known actors, including José Isbert, Manolo Morán, José Luis López Vázquez, Alfredo Landa and Tony Leblanc.1 Writing in The Companion to Spanish Cinema on the ‘politics of stardom’, Chris Perriam and Nuria Triana-​ Toribio have noted the mechanisms and effects of this critical rehabilitation whereby the reputations of certain performers were purged of

in Performance and Spanish film

achieves depth and complexity in its handling of established generic demarcations; in turn it is alert to the boundaries of roles performed within the Western genre, in the diegetic social enclave of Deadwood town. Through an expressive integration of performers and performances in this particular Western world’s settings, the series also explores the boundaries of language, the physical border of setting and locale, and the

in Genre and performance
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Performing the news as parody for the postmodern viewer

performances of the Marx Brothers, the satire of Colbert and Stewart is not merely nihilistic or destructive. Quite the contrary. Writing on the power of satire on the citizen, Dale notes that ‘satire is purposeful and usually compares its objects of ridicule to a norm of better behavior. It hopes to ameliorate’ ( 2000 : 132, my emphasis). Stewart and Colbert hope desperately to ameliorate the postmodern condition of praxis in the

in Genre and performance

5 Democratic accountability and the institutionalisation of performance auditing Introduction This chapter explores the changing role of supreme audit institutions (SAIs), or national audit offices, in the institutionalisation of performance auditing as a part of democratic accountability. It examines how performance auditing of state and other public institutions has become increasingly important in most OECD countries (Posner & Shahan, 2014). Most SAIs seem to have moved from a relatively narrow focus on technical and legal accounting to a wider focus that now

in Neoliberal power and public management reforms

96 Ultras 4 Social media as a space of continuous performance Throughout the season fans everywhere are filled with excitement and anticipation as their teams battle and compete for glory and to avoid disappointment. The success and failure of football clubs becomes a symbolic representation of individuals, cities, regions and nations across the globe. Yet the competition is not limited to what takes place on the field. For ultras, status and solidarity is reflected in their spectacular choreographies, and the new season provides more opportunities for

in Ultras

Throughout the preceding analyses of Agnès Varda's films, the oscillation between objectivity and subjectivity has been a major and recurring theme. Not only does Varda link the 'document brut' (raw documentary footage) to 'ses réponses affectives ou rationnelles' (emotional and rational responses), but also to a 'histoire articulée' (constructed story), a presentable form which will allow the audience to see it differently. This chapter is concerned with the way in which the film treats the question of spectacle and performance, and its relation to direct experience. Varda's fiction films are remarkable for their absence of star actors. Although a constant preoccupation with budgets has to be taken into account, there is enough evidence to suggest that the absence is not a result of stars simply not being available. In other words Varda's interest in major actors is stirred most by their existence as human beings rather than their professional talents.

in Agnès Varda