and, in the philosophy’s more radical forms, capacities were the result of experience and education Education and an ambivalent Enlightenment 27 (broadly conceived). It seemed to follow from this view that familial, pedagogical, and social environments could be designed to influence people’s character – both individual and collective – and to promote particular social, political, or cultural norms.3 Drawing on the works of Fénelon, Locke, Charles Rollin, and others, theorists and reformers came to emphasize the entangled nature of pedagogical and political

in In pursuit of politics
An elusive ideal

7 Republican instruction: an elusive ideal The first years of the French Republic dazzle with the festivals, celebrations, ceremonies, proclamations, and spectacles that seemed to define republican pedagogy. Politics, and political pedagogy, seemed to be everywhere, as legislators “aimed to draw upon all the means of education and of propaganda to disseminate the ‘universal’ principles of morality and ideology.”1 These were also the years in which violence was most inescapably present as a complement and counterpart to public instruction and republican zeal.2

in In pursuit of politics
Abstract only

Introduction In 1925, the economist John Maynard Keynes wrote that he saw ‘only two planks of the historic Liberal platform [as] still seaworthy – the Drink Question and Free Trade’.1 This observation was partly a comment on the parlous state of the Liberal Party at the time, outflanked by the organised labour movement and left with little to distinguish it as a political force. It was also, however, a measure of the extent to which the ‘drink question’ had come to occupy the political centre ground in the preceding decades. The half century between 1870 and

in The politics of alcohol
Political drinking in the seventeenth century

2 Healths, toasts and pledges: political drinking in the seventeenth century He is reputed a peasant, a slave and a bore, that will not take his liquor profoundly. (Thomas Young (after Thomas Nashe)) He is foxt, he is flaw’d, he is flustered, he is subtle, cupshot, cut in the leg or back, he hath seen the French King, he hath swallowed an hair or a taverntoken, he hath whiptd the cat, he hath been at the scriveners and learn’d to make indentures, he hath bit his grannam, or is bit by a barn-weasel. (Thomas Heywood) In the seventeenth century, the stream of

in The politics of alcohol
Ancien Régime schools imagine the future

6 New wine in old bottles? Ancien Régime schools imagine the future Efforts to design new political institutions in the early years of the Revolution were accompanied by attempts to reform or reimagine existing ones so that they might contribute to the emerging social, political, and economic orders. The interplay of invention and reinvention, reform and regeneration was characteristic of revolutionaries’ work across a range of concerns, from reforming the judiciary to redrawing the administrative map of France, from reimagining poor relief to liberalizing the

in In pursuit of politics
Abstract only
Mapping the tyranny

I beg you to take a map of the world, and mark in the two hemispheres every place where you see this abominable system has been established by England. It will give you an idea of the extent of the tyranny. 1 Inviting people to think about a familiar problem in an unfamiliar way, Josephine Butler ( figure 0.1 ) hoped to open their political horizons and critically renew their project. The familiar problem, a preoccupation not only of feminists and moralists but also

in Sex, politics and empire
Reconsidering Talleyrand and Condorcet on public instruction

promised a new and national system of education, it required one, and that the work of securing the Revolution’s gains would continue until the benefits of such a system had taken root among the people. As we saw in Chapter 3, the constitutional committee had identified the establishment of a national system of public instruction as one of its priorities as early as July 1789, when Jérôme-Marie Champion de Cicé included it in a list of legislative imperatives alongside settling the structure of the legislative branch, reforming the national system of political

in In pursuit of politics
Abstract only

Politics and religion were two sides of the same coin. Wesleyan missionaries went to Upper Burma for many and complex reasons but their main purpose was to convert Burmans to Christianity. One scholar described it as a ‘corrupting’ task. 1 Another suggested that giving ‘pagan souls the same cast as our own’ was to personalise imperialism. 2 Few missions achieved the conversion targets set for them by their societies. As a result mission histories are often histories of failure. 3 Conversion rates

in Conflict, politics and proselytism

Exhumation may be defined as the legally sanctioned excavation and recovery of the remains of lawfully buried or – occasionally – cremated individuals, as distinct from forensic excavations of clandestinely buried remains conducted as part of a criminal investigation and from unlawful disinterment of human remains, commonly referred to as bodysnatching. The aim of this article is to review the role of exhumation – so defined – in the activities of CEMEL, the Medico-Legal Centre of the Ribeirão Preto Medical School-University of São Paulo, in international, regional and local collaborations. Exhumations form part of routine forensic anthropology casework; scientific research in physical and forensic anthropology; and forensic casework conducted in collaboration with the Brazilian Federal Police; and are carried out as part of humanitarian investigations into deaths associated with the civil–military dictatorship of 1964 to 1985. This article aims to offer a non-technical summary – with reference to international comparative information – of the role of exhumation in investigative and scientific work and to discuss developments in their historical and political context.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal

instead to ratepayer manipulation (as chapter three explores). 4 And yet historians of rural England have paid remarkably little attention to the politics of hunger in the decades beyond 1800. This is not to say that rural historians have been blind to the issues of hunger. In neighbouring Ireland and, to a lesser extent, Scotland, this period was the

in The politics of hunger