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Murray Pomerance

‘embodied narratives’ (Sobchack, 1995 : 280). While lived gender has medical, political, linguistic, emotional, and navigational facets, filmed gender is constituted as a set of signals about rather than instantiations of, and is therefore an index: of motive, alignment, history, probability, and piety (Burke, 1969 ; Goffman, 1976 ). Screened gender, an attribute of and code for experience-as-represented, may come to

in Monstrous adaptations
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Peter Marks

, complex satire on religious and political orthodoxy. As with other Python projects, the script went through several drafts and meetings, the most successful on Barbados early in 1978, where the group had decamped to rewrite and polish the script. This trip had immense flow-on effects for the Pythons, for Gilliam’s next film, and for independent British film production in the 1980s. For also on the island

in Terry Gilliam
Peter Marks

well as physical incarceration. And the lampooning of Enoch Powell, whose infamous ‘Rivers of Blood’ speech in 1968 had inflamed racial tensions in Britain, hints at a small but detectable political slant to ‘Elephants’. The Powell reference indicates something more considered than a mere stream of consciousness. Surreal humour can operate as part of a satirical social critique

in Terry Gilliam
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Julia M. Wright

associated with music – intervals of sound, the harmonization of difference, and female performance. In Pylea, he sings “Stop! In the Name of Love,” first recorded by the Supremes in 1965, and “Somewhere over the Rainbow,” famously sung by Judy Garland in The Wizard of Oz (1939). The multi-episode narrative arc thus comments extensively on the conservative gender politics borne

in Men with stakes
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"The Pest House," "Hell House," and "The Murder House"
Julia M. Wright

Enlightenment’s idealized vision of modernity as cultural and civic advancement (through rationality and science, equality and political reform) the gothic was consistent with an emerging nostalgia for the pre-modern as more authentic, unmuddied by artificial cultural codes and the technology that alienated humanity from the organic world. Point Pleasant ’s critique of patriarchy in the figure of the

in Men with stakes
Peter Marks

courting disaster at the production stage and derision by critics, acts as one of Gilliam’s invigorating trademarks. Having recognised Parry’s sincere but unrequited love, Jack organises a four-handed date in a Chinese restaurant for Parry, Lydia, Anne and himself, taking the film beyond the damaged male world of the Fisher King myth. The film’s sexual politics partly derive from Johnson’s He , and place

in Terry Gilliam
The early horror films of Mario Bava
Reynold Humphries

imposes this reading. The credits introduce to the spectators the various actors and actresses by presenting them on screen in the presence of dummies. This at once presents the theme and setting of the film – the world of haute couture – and the political subtext, the Marxist implications of which are obvious. Cameron Mitchell, Eva Bartok and the others stand rigidly and seem just as inanimate as the

in Monstrous adaptations
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Peter Marks

explanations of freakishly high or low points in Duke’s emotional or psychological well-being. The exceptions come with more general historical, political or cultural insights, as with the ‘wave speech’, or Duke’s critical take on the teachings of Timothy Leary. These suggest a degree of objective analysis of an era rather than purely the thoughts of the moment, and Depp adopts a more measured voice that

in Terry Gilliam
Australian films in the 1990s
Jonathan Rayner

island, which as in the case of Summerfield (1977) may be taken to represent the Australian continent itself. Realising a new definition of national identity may depend on abandoning the territory plotted and the culture contrived by another (colonial) authority, subjecting the received political and cultural environment to a defamiliarising gaze and the world beyond to an unfamiliar scrutiny. The rite of passage film The protagonist undergoing fundamental, formative and traumatic experience, travelling and

in Contemporary Australian cinema
Fathers from American Gothic to Point Pleasant
Julia M. Wright

has usurped an aristocratic title and property. This is, as in the usurpations of Hamlet , a disruption of the patrilineal exchange of power, a trend that reaches its limit in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (1818) where a man usurps god’s power to create life. In early gothic works with a subversive political bent, the aristocrat is technically legitimate but morally illegitimate – a

in Men with stakes