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Abstract only
Edwin Bacon, Bettina Renz and Julian Cooper

the general public – that particular policy areas are legitimate security concerns and therefore require special attention, oversight, and control. Beginning with the religion law of 1997, and progressing through laws on social organisations, political parties, extremists, migration, foreigners, the media, and political demonstrations, the Russian state has tightened up its control of civil society in recent years. In most of these cases there are sufficient regulations for the state to move with a clear legal basis against groups or individuals which might be

in Securitising Russia
Abstract only
Ahmad H. Sa’di

MUP FINAL PROOF – <STAGE>, 08/19/2013, SPi Concluding remarks Reflections on Israeli policies Israeli policies of population management, surveillance and political control described in this book had not been entirely known before. Scholars who previously wrote on state–minority relations were largely guessing in the dark; thus, their assumptions and biases might have found their ways to the models or narratives they composed. Two widely held theses in Israeli social sciences were disproved in the current study: the absence of a clear state policy towards the

in Thorough surveillance
Lesley Pruitt and Erica Rose Jeffrey

leadership, or at least to intergenerational justice, historically, when it comes to peacebuilding, the UN has typically focused on formal political initiatives such as peace negotiations, elections and institution building. 2 While certainly important, these activities alone are not enough to ensure peace. Furthermore, young people often find it very difficult, if not entirely impossible, to participate in formal political decision-making for peace. 3

in Dancing through the dissonance
Stephen Emerson and Hussein Solomon

means that empower people and societies through political, social, and economic development and build long-term security for all. The changing (and changeless) face of engagement Foreign powers, international organizations, and individuals have been drawn to Africa for centuries. From the colonial period to independence and throughout the Cold War and beyond, external actors have been instrumental in defining not only the nature of African security, but also in determining the continent’s security agenda. Security during the colonial period, as we have seen, was

in African security in the twenty-first century
Abstract only
Ahmad H. Sa’di

MUP REVISED PROOF – <STAGE>, 08/20/2013, SPi 4 Divide et impera Categorizing citizens In chapter 2, following Michel Foucault, I argued that an overriding concern of Israel, like all modern states, is the population (bio-politics), although the population at the centre of Israel’s concern overlaps neither with those who live within its boundaries nor with those holding its citizenship (see chapters 1 and 2). Nevertheless, it has been energetically engaged since its inception in the collection of data – its storage, classification and categorization – according

in Thorough surveillance
Edwin Bacon, Bettina Renz and Julian Cooper

the securitisation approach, it does not come as a surprise that the military intervention in Chechnya in 1999 was initially conveyed discursively in strongly securitised language. After all, the advocating and use of military means to counter a security threat is the epitome of asserting that an issue belongs in the security realm and disregarding the procedures of ‘normal politics’. However, the analysis in this chapter of the events in Chechnya through the prism of the securitisation framework advocated in this book serves an important purpose. First, a study of

in Securitising Russia
Abstract only
Stephen Emerson and Hussein Solomon

7 Health and disease Traditionally viewed as a developmental or a humanitarian challenge, addressing Africa’s pressing public health problems has increasingly come to be seen as a critical human security challenge for the twenty-first century. While many have criticized the securitization of health issues, the cross-cutting linkages to other political, social, and economic issues are real, and so too are the implications for security. For ultimately, if enhancing the safety and well-being of individuals and communities lies at the heart of the human security

in African security in the twenty-first century
Cohesion, contestation and constructivism
Andrew Whiting

theoretical tools, but it is in this chapter that I will address and problematise established cybersecurity knowledge. With this in mind, Chapter 1 aims to achieve two objectives. First, I intend to provide an in-depth overview of cybersecurity knowledge to date that spans academic disciplines, including politics, international relations, security studies, law and computer science. When exploring this research, my aim is to draw attention to the broad ontological, epistemological and methodological homogeneity that is evidenced by a thematic trichotomy of

in Constructing cybersecurity
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Edwin Bacon, Bettina Renz and Julian Cooper

tragedy in Russia, or the terrorist attacks on New York and Washington on 11 September 2001 and on London on 7 July 2005. In the following chapters we consider the extent to which the domestic politics of Russia have been ‘securitised’. The securitisation of an issue occurs when a state takes measures beyond what is ‘normal’ on the grounds that a vital threat exists which demands such measures. In Russia this process of securitisation has been attempted across a range of policy areas, and terrorism is but one threat against Russia which has been cited in this regard

in Securitising Russia
Leonie Holthaus

is a severe lacuna because liberal internationalism has a complicated relationship with German thought and politics. When tensions between liberalism and democratisation became evident within Britain and when British imperial power declined, liberal internationalist views of less civilised societies as well as of a militarist German state involved the accentuation of their own British virtues and recollection of liberal beliefs. Liberal internationalism originated in Victorian Britain, and many Victorians much appreciated German high culture, thought and progress

in Prussians, Nazis and Peaceniks