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membership.12 It is important to realise why scholars have predominantly studied Black middle-class identity through the lens of strategic assimilation. The reason is because much research has highlighted the ‘emotional labour’ that Black middle-class people perform to ‘gain some level of legitimacy and acceptance within white society’.13 Key to this emotional labour is that members of the Black middle class learn how middle-classed spaces – including the professional workplace – are inherently racialised as white, and that to successfully attain legitimate middle

in Black middle class Britannia
Open Access (free)
Actresses, female performers, autobiography and the scripting of professional practice

). Female performers’ autobiographies are markers of their authority as both professional and social actors, as well as being ‘manufactured’ for ‘publicity and profit’ (Postlewait, 2000: 164). ‘Autobiographic scripting’ is embedded in both public and private processes of self-formation and self-fashioning. Theories of selfhood and identity generally accept that the ‘performance of self’ is ‘already entangled amongst a complex web of relations’ (Holmes, 2009: 400), the articulation of which is as valuable as any narrative of singular identity provided in a theatrical

in Stage women, 1900–50

theory (from Plato to Rousseau and Montesquieu) it may also be the result of the democratic benefits of smaller size, automatically enhancing opportunities for citizen participation and diminishing the spatial distance between representative and represented.5 In a regional society characterised by regionalism the scope of regional politicians to develop a distinct class consciousness as professional politicians and to pursue their self-interest at the expense of that of their constituents is further restricted by the importance of ‘identity politics’. In an idealist

in Towards a regional political class?
Crafting a study on Britain’s Black middle class

construed as a space of rarefied, hegemonic whiteness (hegemonic whiteness being the form of whiteness that is both materially dominant and culturally normative). 24 One of the most systematic studies of Britain’s Black middle class was conducted as an Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC)-funded project entitled ‘The Educational Strategies of the Black Middle Classes’. 25 This ESRC project drew on interviews with sixty-two Black people in professional occupations, finding that most Black middle-class folk switch identities when they are around white middle

in Black middle class Britannia
Open Access (free)
Winifred Dolan beyond the West End

becoming obscured by attention to more prominent West End workers. While Small Beer refers to the celebrities whom Dolan encountered, the collection is predominantly concerned with the way in which its author translated early work into theatre making at New Hall, promoting her aptitude as an independent producer and teacher. The school environment provided space for Dolan to construct a distinct form of professional identity that was not contingent upon what Christine de Bellaigue has described as ‘an ideal-type model that simply reproduces the ways in which late

in Stage women, 1900–50
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Lincolnshire Asylum where the case notes amplify his history of de facto alcoholism and sense of persecution. At the heart of his distress was a sense of infringement on his medical identity. He accused unnamed ‘detectives’ of having stolen copies of The Lancet from his railway luggage, and of ‘talking about him in the town to injure his character’.5 Hoyle offers a concentrated vignette of ‘medical misadventure’ in the sense it is construed here. Men might benefit from all of the traditional markers of professional success, including inheritance of an established practice

in Medical misadventure in an age of professionalisation, 1780–1890
Open Access (free)

Alexander Armstrong and Ben Miller used a similar device in the twenty-first century with a sketch of Second World War Royal Air Force fighter pilots using the vocabulary of twenty-first century youth in the professional accents of the 1940s. 39 It is a dimension of identity recognised by writers across the generations. Changing the way you speak changes who you are, or who you are publicly. When Edgar in Shakespeare's King Lear wishes to conceal his identity from his blind father, he adopts a rustic accent and becomes a peasant and a stranger. 40 Fathers were not

in Cultivating political and public identity
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exterior, those who are deemed secure and those who must be deemed threatening in their potential. Prevent then polices this line. Not through the criminal justice system, but through mobilising the circulations of ideas and identities within communities and institutions, and the pastoral duties of care held by professionals, in order to act on these risky identifications. Chapter 5 argued that the analysis of communities developed within conceptions of cohesion is carried through into Prevent, uniting the two policies

in Counter-radicalisation policy and the securing of British identity
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professional identity of missionary wives, meanwhile, can be deepened and complicated by attention to their place within the missionary marriage. Within that paradigm it can be seen that missionary couples shared a conception of mission and marriage as rooted in mutuality of belief and vocational partnership. The fractures between these expectations and the realities of mission life were mediated, soothed and in its most successful manifestations resolved by the multi-layered understandings of missionary matrimony and spousal

in Missionary families
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Implications for war reporting, journalism studies and political phenomenology

unacknowledged power relations both within the journalistic field and in the broader field of cultural production. And to an extent this is the case: a key premise of this book is that the particular form of news values, media ethics and professional identity is secondary to their function. However, this does not render the substance of these categories arbitrary, nor does it mean that these symbolic forms shape journalists’ conscious experience of their work in a way that is disarticulated from events on the ground and meaningful discourses of morality and objectivity. News

in The politics of war reporting