Editor’s Introduction

worst of its rippling social consequences rebelled against systemic injustices. Left-leaning protest movements of indignados took to the streets. They rejected economic austerity and promoted progressive social reform. But they soon became marginal to the spreading politics of anger. In the main, the global backlash is now directed against progressive neoliberalism – the dominant ideological variant of late liberalism – with its ‘flexibilisation’ of everything in the economic sphere and its disintegration of tradition in the social sphere

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
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Governing Precarity through Adaptive Design

. Global Precarity A characteristic of late-modernity, at least in relation to the global North, 3 is what Nikolas Rose has called the ‘death of the social’ ( Rose, 1996 ). This demise is usually equated with the roll-back of the welfare state. Originally meant as a collective insurance-based shield against market forces, since the 1980s the welfare state has been residualised through means-testing, privatisation, cuts and the politics of austerity. Companies and businesses, however, have also shed their former social-democratic responsibilities

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
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Neutrality, discrimination and common carriage

eighth year of austerity economics meant starvation of public funds to deploy high speed networks or to reinforce the staffing of the national telecoms regulators. While Regulation 2015/2120 was published in November 2015, the Body of European Regulators of Electronic Communications (BEREC) was drafting Guidelines to be published in August 2016, with significant doubts that all – or many – of the 28

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reduced from a semi-detached, semi-autonomous consumer voice to a rump of a few non-experts as a result of similar funding cuts. When ministries and regulators were taking austerity-induced 25 per cent cuts in staff, it is hardly surprising that they had no regard to reforming and strengthening a perceived ‘luxury’ policy such as net neutrality. Ed Richards’ July 2010 speech was

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