Search results

Abstract only
Reading, space and intimacy in Chaucer’s Troilus and Criseyde

In purely structural terms, Chaucer’s poem Troilus and Criseyde erects a narrative edifice impressive for its classical austerity. In fact, the text seizes every opportunity of showcasing its highly artificial symmetry: for example, each of the five books begins with an invocation of the Muses or a similar rhetorical topos – the first instances of such invocations in

in Love, history and emotion in Chaucer and Shakespeare
Abstract only
The continuity of cultural value

It is so evidently a show for the Age of Austerity, a show of our favourite artists intended to raise as much money as possible for as little as possible … the exhibits are all taken entirely from the collections of the cash-strapped Academy itself, and its explanatory and interpretative resources are very thin – a little pamphlet in lieu of a catalogue

in Cultural value in twenty-first-century England

over time in collaboration with RSC designer Farah. 4 In Rutter’s words, Hands does not attempt to create ‘a “whole” world’ that ‘approximates “reality”’ (Hampton-Reeves and Rutter 86). Rather, ‘[h]is signature is austerity, and his most stunning visual effects are achieved almost architecturally, by locating bodies in space and writing physical compositions’, effects he

in Coriolanus
Abstract only
How did laywomen become nuns in the early modern world?

significant markers of the transition or conversion taking place. Clothing remained important even after a woman professed. In some profession ceremonies the nun donned her new habit. Habits – though meant to conform to monastic standards of simplicity and austerity – nonetheless had considerable variety and were an important source of identity for nuns. To begin with, different

in Conversions
Abstract only
Cynthia’s Revels imagines the death of the queen

during and as a result of the revels. The revels were explicitly supposed to be a demonstration of Cynthia’s lack of ‘austerity’, so that there is something unsporting about using them as a means of carrying out reformation ‘strictly, and to roote’. Cynthia is, in effect, acting as an agent provocateur . And this speech can also be carried forward to compromise Cynthia when she

in Goddesses and Queens
Abstract only
The Spanish Tragedy IV.iv in performance

Mundi – blank wooden surfaces created an unforgiving austerity. The ruling elite sat rigidly in a line against the back wall in constricting costumes that for all their opulence had been dirtied and degraded by war. Hieronimo, grieving, would stand exposed and alone on the long thrust stage; his ‘garden’ was a mockery of Nature, a row of swaying suspended planks. Bogdanov had located the play in a

in Doing Kyd

seemed lifted from contemporary news reports of, for instance, Greek protests against government austerity measures. However, once more, other than the Senate’s classical architecture in 3.1 and the English ‘Police’ labels on riot shields, there is hardly any way to determine the scenes’ specific locales. Coriolanus emerges as a kind of iconic dictatorial figure representing a general opposition to

in Coriolanus
Women and the work of conversion in early modern England

and heraldic attributes, show the conversion of St Paul, and his own proselytising work in the Middle East, before Agrippa, and in Malta, a further reminder of the self-replicating and proliferating dynamic of conversion. The richness of these visual materials contributes to recent scholarship which has sought to unpick the apparent divide between Catholic iconophilia and Protestant austerity, pointing out

in Conversions

continuity with the past, overlaid with experience at the French court and constrained by financial austerity, one obvious absence is through-​sung opera. While cost was surely significant in shaping Charles’s entertainments, he was nevertheless happy to loosen the purse strings from time to time; Boswell calculated tradesmen’s bills relating to the ‘Queen’s Masque’ at £2,316.1.2, and that was certainly not the limit of what he was willing to pay.22 The first large-​scale musical-​theatrical work at court for which the text survives was composed by the Frenchman Robert

in From Republic to Restoration
Republicanism,exclusion, and the name of king in Nathaniel Lee’s Lucius Junius Brutus

shake your head and cross your arms /​And wonder what the gods and he intend’ (V.2.23–​25). Has Rome removed one tyrant only to earn another? Brutus’s deeds seem to be governed by some personal and arbitrary notion of justice, and what he calls ‘th’austerity of my virtue’ (II.309) is in fact an unrestrained, upstart pride that, when Valerius stabs Titus to spare him the scaffold, makes him exclaim: ‘Why, my Valerius, didst thou rob me of my justice?’ (V.2.150). His sole aim is to live up to a personal notion of righteousness, even at the price of forfeiting his own

in From Republic to Restoration