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Regina Lee Blaszczyk

by measures implemented by the British government to conserve raw materials for the national defence. Food rationing is most often remembered, but austerity measures extended to necessities such as petrol, furnishings and clothing. Two government policies had a direct impact on woollen cloth manufacturers: the Consumer Rationing Scheme and the Utility Scheme. Announced by Oliver Lyttelton on behalf of the Board of Trade on 1 June 1941, the Consumer Rationing Scheme for clothing was in effect until March 1949. Like other parts of the rationing scheme, it

in Fashionability
Regina Lee Blaszczyk

for children’s wear, John Barran & Sons used woollens from Netherfield Mill to make stylish women’s wear. Courtesy of West Yorkshire Archive Service, Leeds: WYL434, Records of John Barran & Sons Ltd, ‘A Parade of Spring Fashions’ at the firm’s Ladies’ Showroom, Leeds, 26 January 1954. Running the mill The postwar culture of austerity stemmed from shortages of energy, raw materials and manpower. Wartime exigencies extended into peacetime as the government controlled the use of raw materials during the transition to a civilian economy. Two

in Fashionability
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Nizan Shaked

Verlag, 1994); and Jennifer A. González, Subject to Display: Reframing Race in Contemporary Installation Art (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2008). 3 Financialisation is the growth of financial markets over that of industry and production that characterises the period from, roughly, 1980 and which is still on-going. David Harvey summarises neoliberalism as a trend towards economic deregulation that, combined with austerity measures, shapes a world–order geared to benefit wealth. See A Brief History of Neoliberalism (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005), a contested term

in The synthetic proposition