Rethinking Digital Divides by Linda Leung
Antonio Díaz Andrade

Linda Leung (2018) Technologies of Refuge and Displacement: Rethinking Digital Divides (Lanham, MA: Lexington Books), hardcover, 141 pages; ISBN: 978-1-14985-0002-9 In her book Technologies of Refuge and Displacement: Rethinking Digital Divides , Linda Leung – a researcher at University of Technology Sydney, Australia – provides a systematic empirical analysis of data collected between 2007 and 2011, which involved more than 100 interviews with individuals from refugee

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Four Decisive Challenges Confronting Humanitarian Innovation
Gerard Finnigan and Otto Farkas

, 28 , 998 , doi: 10.1353/hrq.2006.0039 . ACFID ( 2016 ), Innovation for Impact: How Australian NGOs Nurture and Scale Up New Ideas ( Deakin : Australian Council for International Development ). Age and Disability Capacity Programme (ADCAP) ( 2018 ), Standards for Older People and People with Disabilities: Age and Disability Consortium ( London

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Digital Bodies, Data and Gifts
Kristin Bergtora Sandvik

. Sandvik , K. B. ( 2018 ), ‘ Technology, Dead Male Bodies, and Feminist Recognition: Gendering ICT Harm Theory’ , Australian Feminist Law Journal , 44 : 1 , 49 – 69 . Sandvik , K. B. ( 2019 ), ‘ Technologizing the Fight against Sexual Violence: A Critical Scoping’, PRIO Paper (Oslo: PRIO) , www

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Author: Sara De Vido

The book explores the relationship between violence against women on one hand, and the rights to health and reproductive health on the other. It argues that violation of the right to health is a consequence of violence, and that (state) health policies might be a cause of – or create the conditions for – violence against women. It significantly contributes to feminist and international human rights legal scholarship by conceptualising a new ground-breaking idea, violence against women’s health (VAWH), using the Hippocratic paradigm as the backbone of the analysis. The two dimensions of violence at the core of the book – the horizontal, ‘interpersonal’ dimension and the vertical ‘state policies’ dimension – are investigated through around 70 decisions of domestic, regional and international judicial or quasi-judicial bodies (the anamnesis). The concept of VAWH, drawn from the anamnesis, enriches the traditional concept of violence against women with a human rights-based approach to autonomy and a reflection on the pervasiveness of patterns of discrimination (diagnosis). VAWH as theorised in the book allows the reconceptualisation of states’ obligations in an innovative way, by identifying for both dimensions obligations of result, due diligence obligations, and obligations to progressively take steps (treatment). The book eventually asks whether it is not international law itself that is the ultimate cause of VAWH (prognosis).

Laura Cahillane

be changed: Article 12 is one. Articles 1 and 2 are agreed as stating the position, and we would consider it inadvisable to alter them. Article 12 is the first serious one; Article 17, Article 24 or certain portions of it, Article 36, Article 40, Article 41, Article 50, Article 55, Article 58, Article 65, Article 67, Article 77, Article 79.18 Ibid., col 480, 20 September 1922. The three Dominions he refers to are Canada, Australia and the Union of South Africa. 13 Ibid., cols 498–9, 20 September 1922. Churchill said something similar but in relation to the

in Drafting the Irish Free State Constitution
Margaret Brazier and Emma Cave

the UK government issued a formal apology and set up a £20m support package. 17 But some victims, now in their fifties, seek more comprehensive compensation. An Australian class action against Grünenthal and Diageo (which now owns Distillers) reportedly settled in 2013 for the sum of AUD89 million (£52m). 18 And in June 2014 eight victims of thalidomide filed a claim in the High Court. 19 The anti-rheumatic drug Opren, withdrawn from the UK in 1982, is alleged to have caused kidney and liver damage, and even death, in some of its elderly users. Patients

in Medicine, patients and the law (sixth edition)
Laura Cahillane

. 95 below. 85 It should also be noted that, although the Australian Constitution (The Commonwealth of Australia Act 1900) did not expressly confer a power of judicial review upon the High Court, the doctrine developed years later and is said to be based on a number of provisions in the Constitution. See Anthony Mason, ‘The Role of a Constitutional Court in a Federation: A Comparison of the Australian and the United States Experience’ (1986) 16 Federal Law Review 1, and K.E. Foley, ‘Australian Judicial Review’ (2007) 6 Wash U Global Studies Law Review 281. 86

in Drafting the Irish Free State Constitution
Laura Cahillane

, including those of the Dominions (Canada, South Africa, Australia), the older constitutions such as the Swiss, French and American constitutions, the postwar constitutions of Poland, the Baltic states, Germany, Austria, Czechoslovakia and Estonia as well as a mix of other countries such as Mexico, Norway, Sweden and Denmark. The Committee was impressed with the enthusiasm for democratic ideals and popular sovereignty which permeated the postwar constitutions. In particular, the German (Weimar) Constitution of 1919 was frequently referred to during Interview with Tom

in Drafting the Irish Free State Constitution
Laura Cahillane

once they have seen the Constitution because they will be horribly frightened by the bad example that the Constitution gives to independent elements of the Dominions; I am sure that they will make desperate efforts to get the Oath into the Constitution on the ground that they have stuck it into the Acts creating Dominion Governments in Canada, Australia and Africa.37 He goes on to say they should not concede this point about the inclusion of the oath as it is within their rights to leave it to standing orders. He also notes that he is apprehensive of the concessions

in Drafting the Irish Free State Constitution
Leslie C. Green

enactment of the British Territorial Waters Jurisdiction Act, 1878, 41 and 42 Vict. c. 73. 8 See, e.g., the law in Australia, Canada and the United Kingdom; see also Green, ‘Canadian law, war crimes and crimes against humanity’, 59 Brit. Y.B. Int’l Law (1988), 217

in The contemporary law of armed conflict