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A Study of Black Australian Fiction
Françoise Kral

The aim of this paper is to investigate the nature of the postcolonial Gothic through a focus on Black Australian literature (Plains of Promise by Alexis Wright and Mudrooroo‘s tetralogy, Master of the Ghost Dreaming, The Undying, Underground and The Promised Land). This paper focuses on the process of repossession of the European Gothic intertext and in particular canonical texts like Stoker‘s Dracula, which allows Mudrooroo to revive the subversive potential of the Gothic genre and use it to debunk the colonial discourse. It analyses the workings of the postcolonial Gothic and shows that instead of producing hybrid monsters through intertextual replays, Mudrooroo‘s and Alexis Wright‘s texts seem almost naturally Gothic, as if there was a certain Gothicism inherent in the postcolonial experience.

Gothic Studies
Jerome de Groot

This article considers the childrens writer Alison Uttley, and, particularly, her engagements with debates regarding science and philosophy. Uttley is a well-known childrens author, most famous for writing the Little Grey Rabbit series (1929–75), but very little critical attention has been paid to her. She is also an important alumna of the University of Manchester, the second woman to graduate in Physics (1907). In particular, the article looks at her novel A Traveller in Time through the lens of her thinking on time, ethics, history and science. The article draws on manuscripts in the collection of the John Rylands Library to argue that Uttley‘s version of history and time-travel was deeply indebted to her scientific education and her friendship with the Australian philosopher Samuel Alexander.

Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Abstract only
Bruce Woodcock

You people don’t realise what it is you have to sell. ( Illywhacker , 348) W ITH Illywhacker , Carey’s success achieved international dimensions. It was published first in the UK and USA, something of an irony for a novel exposing cultural imperialism. 1 The University of Queensland Press acquired the Australian rights and implemented a wide advertising campaign using international responses as promotion. The effect was to increase Carey’s profile and sales dramatically in Australia and abroad. 2 The novel

in Peter Carey
John Kinsella

1 Peter Carey, True History of the Kelly Gang (London, Faber and Faber, 2000). 207 MAD0339_KINSELLA_v2.indd 207 05/12/2016 11:11 Polysituatedness story that has been translated into ‘character’ and ‘identity’ of ‘Australia’. His living and writing out of New York City make for an interesting internationalist subtext. John Mateer, with his movements between South Africa and Australia, and ‘elsewhere’ in the world, embodies at least some of the modus operandi of the polysituating artist, while Barbara Temperton, a very ‘local’ and Western Australian poet

in Polysituatedness
Abstract only
Don Randall

5 The Great World Although it carries on with the multiple-worlds orientation, The Great World is more thoroughly a novel of transactions. In Harland’s Half Acre the lines of impact and influence are at times unidirectional: one learns in appreciable detail the effect Knack has on Edna or Frank, but the narration remains silent about how either of these characters impacts upon Knack. The 1990 novel is more scrupulous in demonstrating that change, in the human world, is nearly always a matter of exchange. Australian identity, both individual and national, is

in David Malouf
Abstract only
John Kinsella

had not been emptied yet. I wrote him the ‘Massey-Ferguson Tractor’ poem in his honour (a poem of tractors in Cork and tractors of my childhood in Western Australia) – he drives his tractor everywhere (as farmers do here into town to the shops). He said I could have a drive (though I didn’t). Might read some of Sinclair Lewis’s Arrowsmith later (bought it with a bunch of other books from the excellent Whyte Books in Schull). 15 October 2013 Rough weather at Carraiglea. Gannets. Small boats doing it rough traversing the bay. Binoculars (on the ledge before the

in Polysituatedness
Abstract only
John Kinsella

III MANIFESTOES Anthologising the nation Since the mid-1990s, I have edited a number of special Australian issues of literary journals from Britain, Canada, and the United States. I have also edited an anthology of contemporary Australian poetry, Landbridge (1999a), and am at present completing a two-volume historical anthology. These projects were very different in orientation from the process of including Australian poetry (and prose) in the many ‘general’ issues of literary journals that I edited over the same period of time, and indeed over the last dozen

in Disclosed poetics
Open Access (free)
The Australian and New Zealand repertoires and fortunes of North American performers Margaret Anglin, Katherine Grey and Muriel Starr
Veronica Kelly

7 Emotional and natural The Australian and New Zealand repertoires and fortunes of North American performers Margaret Anglin, Katherine Grey and Muriel Starr Veronica Kelly It is difficult to assess the international careers of touring stage performers in the early twentieth century without considering the related categories of the transnational and technological biographies. Deacon, Russell and Woollacott state that situated and regional readings of global mobility have their value: ‘we must abandon the search for the “whole subject” and allow that fragments

in Stage women, 1900–50
Don Randall

in a broadly drawn economy of bodies lends credence to Taylor’s conviction that Conversations represents the body ‘as the site and origin of a comprehensive identity – both personal and national’.6 The body is the first realm of the proper, ‘the primary metonymy of place’,7 the first place where one always must be if one is to be anywhere else at all. But ‘convicts were no longer British subjects according to law but human property of the Crown’.8 Most convicts transported to Australian penal colonies had offended against property: in other words, their offence

in David Malouf
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Fly Away Peter and Harland’s Half Acre
Don Randall

modes of self-location: he is an Australian landowner (with considerable holdings) and yet one who ‘had been away to school in England and then at Cambridge’ (FAP 3). Birds, one soon learns, are messengers from other worlds: the dollar bird comes ‘down from the Mollucas’, the ‘Sacred Kingfisher’ from Borneo (FAP, 14, 29); sandpipers carry knowledge of ‘northern Asia or Scandanavia’ (FAP, 19) – and of England, and of Australia (FAP, 25). Places of being are spectacularly multiple and discover their relationship through migrations, transfers – innumerable movements to

in David Malouf