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THERE ARE A number of avenues through which the ‘place’ of Indigenous people in Australia can be approached. One fundamental arena of struggle has been over land rights. The approach to rights taken here, however, starts from an account of suffering and sets out to trace the political roots of that suffering. One of the clearest forms of suffering to mark Aboriginal lives in Australia is entrenched and widespread ill-health. Thus, across the Indigenous community, the story is one of premature death, often from diseases associated with

in Human rights and the borders of suffering

3 Australian foreign policy and the vernacular of national belonging Katie Linnane On 22 October 2014 a gunman opened fire on the Canadian National War Memorial and Houses of Parliament, killing a soldier on ceremonial duty and injuring three others. In expressing sympathy on behalf of all Australians, then Prime Minister, Tony Abbott (2013–15), announced: ‘today more than ever, Australians and Canadians are family’ (Wroe 2014). On the surface, such a statement of solidarity appeared both appropriate and unexceptional. In times of crisis or catastrophe

in The politics of identity

10 The European Union in Australia and New Zealand Nicole Scicluna Introduction The relationship between the EU, on the one hand, and Australia and New Zealand, on the other, reveals a paradox. The links between both of these South Pacific nations and the nations of Europe are deep, multifaceted and longstanding. Australia and New Zealand are former British colonies. Their political and legal institutions are modelled to a large extent on Westminster, their political values and culture flow largely from British sources. Following European settlement and the

in The European Union in the Asia-Pacific

5 New Social Democratic governments in Britain and Australia Yet Gillard’s reinstatement of the centrality of markets leaves Labor with some dilemmas that Rudd’s trenchant critiques of neo-liberalism had  at  least sought to address. For, if there are no significant problems  with  relying on markets then why do we need social democratic parties? Carol Johnson, 2011 The New Social Democracy in Australia and Britain This chapter introduces four cases of the New Social Democracy in action. It describes the Australian roots of the NSD and ­reinforces the renewed

in The search for democratic renewal

MUP FINAL PROOF – <STAGE>, 08/03/2013, SPi 8 Monarchy and religion in Canada, Australia and the Commonwealth The discussion turns to consider the evidence of the patterns of religious affiliation and belief to be found among all the realms of the monarch with a view to determining their compatibility with the inherited religious rituals of accession and coronation or possible successor forms. Consideration is also given as to the question of the continued viability of collective ritual for all the realms and the possibility of there being individualised

in Monarchy, religion and the state

WOMEN’S POLICY MACHINERY IN AUSTRALIA 243 12 The life and times of women’s policy machinery in Australia1 marian sawer Historically in Australia women have been policy shapers as well as policy takers and have called on the state to promote social reform and equal opportunity. This was the path that led to the appearance of ‘femocrats’ in government in the 1970s and 1980s, with a mandate to achieve more gender equality policy outcomes. Australia became well known for its femocrats, a term that Australia gave the world, and for their innovations in governance

in Mainstreaming gender, democratizing the state?
Rethinking Digital Divides by Linda Leung

Linda Leung (2018) Technologies of Refuge and Displacement: Rethinking Digital Divides (Lanham, MA: Lexington Books), hardcover, 141 pages; ISBN: 978-1-14985-0002-9 In her book Technologies of Refuge and Displacement: Rethinking Digital Divides , Linda Leung – a researcher at University of Technology Sydney, Australia – provides a systematic empirical analysis of data collected between 2007 and 2011, which involved more than 100 interviews with individuals from refugee

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Four Decisive Challenges Confronting Humanitarian Innovation

, 28 , 998 , doi: 10.1353/hrq.2006.0039 . ACFID ( 2016 ), Innovation for Impact: How Australian NGOs Nurture and Scale Up New Ideas ( Deakin : Australian Council for International Development ). Age and Disability Capacity Programme (ADCAP) ( 2018 ), Standards for Older People and People with Disabilities: Age and Disability Consortium ( London

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Digital Bodies, Data and Gifts

. Sandvik , K. B. ( 2018 ), ‘ Technology, Dead Male Bodies, and Feminist Recognition: Gendering ICT Harm Theory’ , Australian Feminist Law Journal , 44 : 1 , 49 – 69 . Sandvik , K. B. ( 2019 ), ‘ Technologizing the Fight against Sexual Violence: A Critical Scoping’, PRIO Paper (Oslo: PRIO) , www

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Responses to crisis and modernisation

This book considers the underlying causes of the end of social democracy's golden age. It argues that the cross-national trend in social democratic parties since the 1970s has been towards an accommodation with neo-liberalism and a corresponding dilution of traditional social democratic commitments. The book looks at the impact of the change in economic conditions on social democracy in general, before examining the specific cases of Germany, Sweden and Australia. It examines the ideological crisis that engulfed social democracy. The book also looks at the post-1970 development of social policy, its fiscal implications and economic consequences in three European countries. It considers the evolution of the Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE) from its re-emergence as a significant political force during the 1970s until the present day under José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero. The book also examines the evolution of the Swedish model in conjunction with social democratic reformism and the party's relations to the union movement. It explores the latest debate about what the German Social Democratic Party (SPD) stands for. The SPD became the role model for programmatic modernisation for the European centre-left. The book considers how British socialist and social democratic thought from the late nineteenth century to the present has treated the objective of helping people to fulfil their potential, talents and ambitions. It aims to contribute to a broader conversation about the future of social democracy by considering ways in which the political thought of 'third way' social democracy might be radicalised for the twenty-first century.