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An introduction for speakers of English (Second edition)

The most complete guide available to the correct pronunciation of German for native English speakers. Revised and updated, a new feature for this edition is that the discussion of English-speaking learners' pronunciation problems has been extended to include American learners, reflecting the worldwide usage of the first volume. Each chapter deals with a separate aspect of the problems of modern German pronunciation; vowels, consonants, stress and intonation, and the reduced ('weak') forms of conversational pronunciation. Comprehensively illustrated with clear pronunciation and intonation diagrams emphasising common problems experienced when learning German. The Manchester University Press website also gives readers access to twenty-two audio files which complement the content of the book, providing examples of pronunciation, stress and intonation, and listening exercises.

Jasmine Kilburn-Toppin
,
Elaine Tierney
, and
Charlotte Wildman

geared towards students undertaking research in Britain, reflecting the primary market for this book, as well as our own expertise. But, where possible, we have framed the text so that our general advice is applicable to other local, national and international contexts. More significantly, building on Chapter 3 ’s emphasis on networks, our discussions are rooted in an approach to history that takes seriously the reciprocal and mutually defining relationships between sometimes geographically distant places, and

in Researching urban space and the built environment
Abstract only
Clare Wilkinson
and
Emma Weitkamp

university, although communication still tended to be of a more public style. In Britain the initial publications and presentations of the Royal Society (established in 1660) were often formal but relatively accessible, designed for those with a more general interest, and it was not until the middle of the nineteenth century that the society’s publications and presentations took on a far more specialised nature (Knight, 2006 ). Without a clear profession or its associated salary, ‘researchers’ or ‘practitioners’ of the time who did not teach the classical

in Creative research communication
Jasmine Kilburn-Toppin
,
Elaine Tierney
, and
Charlotte Wildman

other collecting institutions. Close analysis and comparison of the expectations and use of different kinds of writing results in a rich picture of the social, spatial and material dimensions of manuscript and printed sources, from letters and ledger books to printed travellers’ accounts. Focusing on the use, circulation and reception of writing in its many forms brings Britain and the East Indies ‘into a single interpretative frame’. 20 Ultimately, this enables ‘geographies of knowledge and power that are both firmly

in Researching urban space and the built environment
Abstract only
Christopher Hall

, communication between regions (which was where the need for standardisation was felt) was predominantly written communication, whereas spoken communication was predominantly within the local community. These are general, if not universal, factors, of course, and so it is generally true that written language is more standardised than spoken language. But whereas in politically more united countries like England and France pronunciation standards such as Southern British Standard (or Received 4 Modern German pronunciation Pronunciation) and Parisian French emerged, the

in Modern German pronunciation
Jasmine Kilburn-Toppin
,
Elaine Tierney
, and
Charlotte Wildman

centre, as the new capital of India in 1911 aimed to consolidate imperial power, as the existing capital, Calcutta (now Kolkata), was the centre of nationalist movements and anticolonial uprisings. Designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens, the most prominent English architect of the early twentieth century, the comprehensive urban redevelopment plan aimed to build a monumental cityscape that reinforced the power and authority of the British Empire with clearly zoned administrative and residential areas. Officially opened in 1931

in Researching urban space and the built environment
Jasmine Kilburn-Toppin
,
Elaine Tierney
, and
Charlotte Wildman

- and early twentieth-century British colonial identities and discourses were made by means of connections and networks that stretched across the globe, forged by the circulation of government dispatches, maps and visual representations, newspaper reports, letters, people, things and commodities. 39 To take one part of his argument, the biological determinism of discourses about ‘inherent racial inequality’ were shaped by the networks between colonial settlers in settings as various as the West Indies, South

in Researching urban space and the built environment
Kelly Rushton
and
Owen Price

they work, so it is advisable to enlist the help of someone who is experienced in using them. Hospital and/or University librarians are often happy to book you in for an individual session on request. A Research Handbook for Patient and Public Involvement Researchers Selecting the data sources - where to search Figure 7 Examples of electronic databases As a Minimum • Cochrane Library (all sources) • Medline • Embase Nursing-Specific • British Nursing Index • CINAHL N.B. Which databases you choose depends on your review question but you will need to be able to

in A research handbook for patient and public involvement researchers
Andrew Balmer
and
Anne Murcott

. Providing some basic numerical data: This can help to show the prevalence (or otherwise) of the phenomenon under consideration. For example, the opening paragraph of an answer to an essay question about racism in football could usefully include some figures about attitudes to ethnic differences from the British Social Attitudes Survey. These data might help you to show that racism persists in Britain. Whilst the figures may not be about football directly, they serve to contextualise the issue of racism in football against broader patterns of racism in society at large

in The craft of writing in sociology
Andrew Balmer
and
Anne Murcott

general approach, the design of your study and the methods that you will use. Consider the example from a student’s first attempt to frame her dissertation question and a couple of her sub-questions: Main question: How do contemporary integration discourses construct Muslims, Britishness and their relations? Sub-question 1: How do labels and narratives of radicalisation and community cohesion construct ideas of what it means to be British? Sub-question 2: In what ways are Muslims constructed in relation to the War on Terror

in The craft of writing in sociology