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Exploring long-distance loyalist networks in the 1880s
William Jenkins

-imperial discourse of ‘British liberties’ to structure rationales for why British imperialism had been a force for good in the world. They also found their place in the Orange wings of the Conservative parties active in both locations. What had conferred ‘civic and religious freedoms’ under ‘the British flag’ in one place would faithfully do the same in another. Networks thus did more than simply connect places – they structured localized under- - Sept. 23 Peterborough St. Catharines Catherines - Sept. Sept. 15 15 - Oct. 1, 2 - Sept. 28 Belleville Kingston - Sept. 27 La w

in Migrations
Laura Chrisman

share equally complicated relations with materialist theory: Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak and Fredric Jameson. Spivak, a selfdesignated ‘Marxist-feminist-deconstructionist’, is highly regarded as one of the key practitioners of post-colonial theory; Jameson is one of the leading left theorists of culture in the USA. These three thinkers have each produced an impressively large and wide-ranging opus of critical thought. My concern here, however, is exclusively with their respective analyses of nineteenth- and early twentieth-century British imperialism.4 I want to

in Postcolonial contraventions
The 1940s to the 1960s
A. James Hammerton

the timeless reasoning that it would be ‘better for the children’. But we will see in this chapter ways in which the deeply traditional thinking of postwar migrants also left room for a more modern outlook, in which an openness to ‘adventure’ paved the way for new patterns of migrant behaviour in later years. The diversity of migration experience was further widened by the midcentury shadow of British imperialism, and ways in which the middle and upper classes imported old habits of easy mobility to new migration opportunities. Mobile journeys to affluence and self

in Migrants of the British diaspora since the 1960S
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Democratic conflict and the public university
Ruth Sheldon

liberal-​democratic nation-​state in relation to the ‘War on Terror’ and explore how this narrative is rooted in liberal, secular and nationalist imaginaries. I explore how these contemporary framings have emerged in relation to evolving inter and intracommunal relations within 14 Tragic encounters and ordinary ethics the British civil sphere and are shaped by less-​acknowledged intertwined histories and geographies of the Holocaust, British imperialism, migrations and racisms. Turning to consider an alternative focus on the involvement of diasporic and left-​ wing

in Tragic encounters and ordinary ethics
Irish republican media activism since the Good Friday Agreement
Author: Paddy Hoey

Newspapers, magazines and pamphlets have always been central, almost sacred, forms of communication within Irish republican political culture. While social media is becoming the primary ideological battleground in many democracies, Irish republicanism steadfastly expresses itself in the traditional forms of activist journalism.

Shinners, Dissos and Dissenters is a long-term analysis of the development of Irish republican activist media since 1998 and the tumultuous years following the end of the Troubles. It is the first in-depth analysis of the newspapers, magazines and online spaces in which the differing strands of Irish republicanism developed and were articulated during a period where schism and dissent defined a return to violence.

Based on an analysis of Irish republican media outlets as well as interviews with the key activists that produced them, this book provides a compelling long-term snapshot of a political ideology in transition. It reveals how Irish Republicanism was moulded by the twin forces of the Northern Ireland Peace Process and the violent internal ideological schism that threatened a return to the ‘bad old days’ of the Troubles.

This book is vital for those studying Irish politics and those interestedin activism as it provides new insights into the role that modern activist media forms have played in the ideological development of a 200-year-old political tradition.

Open Access (free)
Anne McClintock and H. Rider Haggard
Laura Chrisman

Imperialism and South African Resistance in Haggard, Schreiner and Plaatje (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2000), for an elaboration of the arguments here. See John MacClure, Late Imperial Romance (London: Verso, 1994), for a discussion of the imperial romance genre. chapter2 21/12/04 50 11:09 am Page 50 Imperialism 12 See Bernard Magubane, The Making of a Racist State: British Imperialism and the Union of South Africa, 1875–1910 (Trenton: Africa World Press, 1996), for an historical account of this period. 13 For an example of this discourse analysis mode see David Spurr

in Postcolonial contraventions
Open Access (free)
Laura Chrisman

range of British imperialism generated significantly different modes of ‘othering’. ‘Orientalism’s ongoing hegemony as an academic template for the entire colonised world suggests that this truism bears reiteration.18 As I have suggested elsewhere, Perhaps it was inevitable that ‘The Orient’ should have been privileged, given the sheer longevity of European colonial relations with it. But this argues for the highly unrepresentative nature of the colonialism that developed there. Nineteenth-century British India, so central to the theoretical work of Spivak and Bhabha

in Postcolonial contraventions
Tom Inglis

symbolic domination with the legacy of British imperialism8 It tends to overlook other external forms of symbolic domination, particularly from America and the Catholic Church and internal forms that emanate from gender, class, religious, ethnic and racial differences. It may well be, for example, that if the Irish are different this may be related more to the nature of the internal class structure, the dominance of the Catholic Church and the oppression of women and children than to having been colonised by England. If we are to understand continuing Irish difference

in Are the Irish different?
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Ethnic associationalism and an English diaspora
Tanja Bueltmann and Donald M. MacRaild

March 1882.  5 Krishan Kumar, The Making of English National Identity (Cambridge, 2003), p. 176.  6 Peter Clark, British Clubs and Societies 1580‒1800: The Origins of an Associational World (Oxford, 2000), passim.  7 Alexis de Tocqueville, Democracy in America, 2 vols (New York, 2004), vol. 2:2, p. 595.  8 Ibid., p. 596.  9 Robert Freke Gould, The History of Freemasonry, 3 vols (London, 1882–87); Jessica L. Harland-Jacobs, Builders of Empire: Freemasonry and British Imperialism, 1717‒1927 (Chapel Hill, NC, 2007), and Jessica L. HarlandJacobs, ‘“Hands across the Sea

in The English diaspora in North America
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Unsettling subjects of justice and ethics
Ruth Sheldon

Palestine–​Israel in relation to historically evolving relations within the British civil sphere, the emergent geopolitics of the ‘War on Terror’ and the historic legacies of the Holocaust and British imperialism. Finally, I  consider how public constructions of this as an ‘imported’, ‘ethno-​religious’ conflict have failed to address the role played by British university institutions in shaping these dynamics. I discuss how in a postimperial globalising world the ‘public university’ has become a site of tragic conflict and how this produces different challenges for

in Tragic encounters and ordinary ethics