Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 15 items for :

  • "British imperialism" x
  • Manchester Security, Conflict & Peace x
Clear All
Abstract only
Vicky Randall

those who have assumed that the conceptual frameworks provided by evolutionism led to a confidence in British supremacy, Freeman’s writings suggest that racial ideas did not necessarily issue in an ethnocentric belief in progress and did not always transform Victorian interpretations of the past. Freeman’s cultural conception of race was inextricably associated with the older Liberal Anglican philosophy of history, which was not unilinear. Contrary to the assumption that there is a link between the rise of racial theory and the rhetoric and ambitions of British

in History, empire, and Islam
The critique of British expansionism
Vicky Randall

political tendencies of the entire Aryan race. 1 Second, Freeman’s account of Aryan development was not unilinear but cyclical. In Freeman’s analysis, liberty was always precarious due to the difficulty of securing an optimal-size polity on the one hand, and the political participation of the citizenry on the other. It was Freeman’s preoccupation with the history of the Aryan race, understood in these terms, that informed his response to British imperialism. While scholars such as Hall, John MacKenzie, and Jeffrey Richards have suggested that the Victorians were

in History, empire, and Islam
Abstract only
‘History is past politics, politics is present history’
Vicky Randall

research of the practitioners of the comparative method, Müller and Maine. It will be argued that Freeman’s intuitive acceptance of the comparative method was prepared by Arnold, as he sought to identify similarities in the institutions of ancient and modern Europe and to ‘prove’ the existence of an Aryan race based on a common democratic culture. Charting the advancing civilisation of the Greeks, Romans, and Teutons, Freeman’s celebration of Aryan continuity was tinged with Arnoldian anxieties about recapitulation, and this led him to fear the consequences of British

in History, empire, and Islam
Vicky Randall

120,000 1896 Armenians, Constantinople 2,000 76 Freeman, ‘The English People in Relation to the Eastern Question’, pp. 490–2. 77 Jonathan Parry , The Politics of Patriotism: English Liberalism, National Identity and Europe, 1830–1886 ( Cambridge : Cambridge University Press , 2006 ). The relationship of the Eastern Question to wider imperial policy is also considered in Leslie Rogne Schumacher, A ‘Lasting Solution’: The Eastern Question and British Imperialism, 1875–1878 , unpublished PhD thesis, University of Minnesota, 2012. 78 Shannon

in History, empire, and Islam
Abstract only
Heike Wieters

? , Cambridge, 2003. 33 Rosenberg, “Missions to the World,” p. 242; Curti, American Philanthropy Abroad , pp. 229, 395; Harald Fischer-Tiné, “Global Civil Society and the Forces of Empire. The Salvation Army, British Imperialism, and the ‘Prehistory’ of NGOs (ca. 1880–1920),” in Sebastian Conrad and Dominic

in The NGO CARE and food aid From America, 1945–80
Heike Wieters

Roger Louis, Ends of British Imperialism. The Scramble for Empire, Suez and Decolonization; Collected Essays , London, 2006; see essays on Suez, pp. 589–725; Muhammad Abd el-Wahab Sayed-Ahmed, Nasser and American Foreign Policy, 1952–1956 , London, 1989, pp. 97–145; Michael B. Oren, “Escalation to Suez: The Egypt-Israel Border War, 1949–56,” Journal of Contemporary

in The NGO CARE and food aid From America, 1945–80
Alexis Heraclides and Ada Dialla

imperialist project. 25 Jennifer Pitts mentions only two alternative thinkers in nineteenth-century Britain critical of British imperialism: the linguist Henry Stanley and the polymath Francis Newman (brother of the famous cardinal Newman). 26 But the most widely known liberal critics of the British Empire were Richard Cobden, John Bright and Herbert Spencer. 27 In France, Gaston Jèze and Charles Solomon were critical of colonial rule but they did not

in Humanitarian intervention in the long nineteenth century
Adrian Millar

Millar, The Constitution of Republican Identity in Belfast: A Lacanian Psychoanalysis (PhD dissertation, University College Dublin, 1999), p. 241). 17 Smith notes the tendency among republicans to view those nationalists whom they perceive as being persuaded by British imperialism as being morally ‘weak people

in Socio-ideological fantasy and the Northern Ireland conflict
Abstract only
Lucy P. Chester

could still rally public support, his influence within the Congress Party was waning and he had little direct involvement in the partition negotiations. 5 ) Evan Jenkins, the Governor of pre-partition Punjab, emerges as a Cassandra-like figure, persistently warning of the dire consequences of partition. But my argument also has a great deal to do with the sweeping drives of British imperialism, Indian

in Borders and conflict in South Asia
The historical context of partition
Lucy P. Chester

(Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1985 ), p. 119. 18 P. J. Cain and Anthony Hopkins, British Imperialism: Crisis and Deconstruction, 1914–1990 (London: Longman, 1993 ), p. 196. 19 See Wm. Roger Louis, The

in Borders and conflict in South Asia