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The children of the Vietnam War
Sabine Lee

4 Bui Doi: the children of the Vietnam War If many of the emotional challenges facing children born of the Second World War were a result of them being part of a hidden population,1 the situation was often the exact opposite for children born of later conflicts. The parentage of children fathered by US soldiers during the Vietnam War, for instance, visibly set them apart from children of Vietnamese parents and thus exposed them to adversities as a result of openly being associated with the enemy. The situation of children born of American GIs in Asia was almost

in Children born of war in the twentieth century
Author: Sabine Lee

In the early twenty-first century, children fathered by foreign soldiers during and after conflicts are often associated directly with gender-based violence. This book investigates the situations of children born of war (CBOW) since the Second World War, provides a historical synthesis that moves beyond individual case studies, and explores circumstances across time and geopolitical location. The currently used definitions and categorisations of CBOW are presented together with an overview of some key groups of CBOW. Specific conflict areas are chosen as key case studies on the basis of which several core themes are explored. These conflicts include the Second World War (1939-1945) with the subsequent post-war occupations of Germany and Austria (1945-1955). The Vietnam War (1955-1975), the Bosnian War (1992-1995), some African Conflicts of the 1990s and early 2000s, in particular in Rwanda (1994) and Uganda (1988-2006), are also examined. In the case studies, the experiences of the children are explored against the background of the circumstances of their conception. For example, the situation of the so-called Bui Doi, children of American soldiers and Vietnamese mothers is examined. The experiences of Amerasian CBOW who were adopted into the United States as infants following the Operation Babylift and those who moved as young adults following the American Homecoming Act are juxtaposed. The book also looks into the phenomenon of children fathered by UN peacekeeping personnel as a starting point for a discussion of current developments of the international discourse on CBOW.

An introduction
Sabine Lee

post-war occupations have been increasingly vocal in ‘telling their stories’, both in the 12 CBOW in the twentieth century context of participatory research and in their own public engagements. It is therefore possible to include their own views and evaluations of their experiences in the analysis, too. Chapter 4 will explore the situation of the so-called Bui Doi, children of American soldiers and Vietnamese mothers conceived during the Vietnam War. As indicated above, this particular case study is enlightening for a variety of reasons, which determine the

in Children born of war in the twentieth century
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A new dimension of genocidal rape and its children
Sabine Lee

on the part of the mothers, due to the child’s association with the perpetrators. An important aspect of the children’s segregation and discrimination is the name-giving and name-calling. At societal level, this has been noted for almost all children fathered by enemy soldiers from the Bui Doi in Vietnam to the tserkunge (child of a German) in post-war Norway; from krigsbarn (war child) to enfants maudits (cursed children) and enfants non-desirés (unwanted children). Even more pronounced is the negative impact, if the names of the children are directly associated

in Children born of war in the twentieth century