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Mary Chamberlain

dialectical relationship emerged also in Lamming. This was so most noticeably in his insights on the language shared, and synthesised, by both Caliban and Prospero. 26 For the language which Prospero gave to Caliban created new possibilities for thought itself: Prospero has given Caliban Language; and with it an unstated history of

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Digesting Africa
Tim Youngs

the process whereby man transforms raw materials before and, with a view to, eating them’. 50 The whites’ use of food in securing their dominance was nothing new. Peter Hulme, examining the colonial encounter between Europe and the New World, has pointed out how, in The Tempest : Caliban makes it plain

in Travellers in Africa
Cultural awakenings and national belongings
Mary Chamberlain

belonging to the landscape; disassociation, in fact, of art from the act of living’. 4 This bifurcation has been a constant theme of black intellectuals and writers. George Lamming expressed the predicament using language as both a metaphor of subjugation and a literal expression of Caribbean colonisation. ‘Prospero’, he wrote, ‘lives in the absolute certainty that Language which is his gift to Caliban is

in Empire and nation-building in the Caribbean
Open Access (free)
Crossing the seas
Bill Schwarz

-century Caribbean fiction does carry a profound consciousness of historical time. For an overview, see Nana Wilson-Tagoe, Historical Thought and Literary Representation in West Indian Literature (Gainesville: University of Florida Press, 1998), and more specifically, Supriya Nair, Caliban’s Curse: George Lamming and the reconfiguring of history (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
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Deviant psychology in Kenya Colony
Will Jackson

, others have sought to address directly colonialism’s psychological repercussions. In his 1956 book, Prospero and Caliban: The Psychology of Colonization , the French psychoanalyst, Octave Mannoni described what he termed a colonial ‘complex’. Colonialism, Mannoni argued, engendered dependency on the part of colonised peoples and domination on the part of colonial Europeans. 58 Five years later

in Madness and marginality
The tragic voice of Richard Wright
Bill Schwarz

currents and to Henry’s original argument: P. Henry, Caliban’s Reason: Introducing Afro-Caribbean Philosophy (New York: Routledge, 2000). Through the postwar period Présence Africaine published, amongst others, Basil Davidson, Ronald Segal, Kwame Nkrumah, Julius Nyere, Eric Williams, George Padmore, Richard Pankhurst and Fenner Brockway

in Cultures of decolonisation
Claude McKay’s experience and analysis of Britain
Winston James

’, Wellesley College, April 1991. I never claimed, contrary to Paget Henry’s caricature of my argument, that James’s celebration of Western civilisation ‘has its roots in Eurocentric tendencies that James inherited from Marxism’: Paget Henry, Caliban’s Reason: introducing Afro-Caribbean philosophy (New York: Routledge, 2000), p. 48. I know better than that and made it clear in my

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
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Kipling’s secret sharer
Norman Etherington

educating Caliban: that the misshapen savage now knows how to curse his benefactor and aspires to mate with his daughter. More proximately, it resonates with a celebrated mid-century essay by Thomas Carlyle on ‘the Nigger Question’. 42 Conrad and Carlyle In the guise of an imaginary address to an anti-slavery meeting, Carlyle had attacked West Indians

in Imperium of the soul
Racial politics, luso-tropicalism and development discourse in late Portuguese colonialism
Caio Simões de Araújo and Iolanda Vasile

and Caliban: Colonialism, Postcolonialism, and Inter-identity’, Luso-Brazilian Review 39, 1 ( 2002 ), pp. 9–43. 15 Maria Helena da Cunha Rato, ‘O colonialismo português, factor de subdesenvolvimento nacional’, Análise Social 19, 3–5 (1983), pp. 1121

in Developing Africa
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Mary Chamberlain

, The Black Atlantic. Modernity and Double Consciousness (London: Verso 1993); P. Henry, Caliban’s Reason. Introducing Afro-Caribbean Philosophy (New York and London: Routledge, 2000); R. Carr, Black Nationalism in the New World: Reading the African American and West Indian Experience (Durham, North Carolina: Duke University Press, 2003 ). W. Bell

in Empire and nation-building in the Caribbean