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Jane Chin Davidson

, while his colleague Paul Lieberenz, who accompanied him, had made an early anthropology film titled With Sven Hedin Across the Deserts of Asia in 1928.3 Through Minor, Chang engages in the historical subject of anthropology and the documentary film form in an entirely conceptual way. The second work explored is Chang’s 2005 video project titled Shangri-La, named after the fictional paradise that James Hilton imagined for his 1933 novel Lost Horizon which Frank Capra made into a film of the same title in 1937. In 2001, the town of Zhongdian in the north of China near

in Staging art and Chineseness
John Mundy and Glyn White

responsible for the successful innovations; it does not develop in a vacuum and in this instance stage comedy (for example, Noël Coward’s Private Lives (1931)) was an important influence that remains under-recognised. It is also clear that Hollywood wasn’t entirely sure how it had improved on this venerable tradition. The It Happened One Night director Frank Capra quoted collaborator Myles Connelly

in Laughing matters
Techniques, materials, land, energy, environments
Andrew Patrizio

; applying the lessons of ecosystems to our human communities (Capra). Sustainability – designing our lives, work, products, social systems, and relationships to meet the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs (World Commission on Environment and Development). Social and Biological Diversity – understanding that diversity among disciplines, cultures, and species is a prerequisite for systems health and resilience. Social and Environmental Justice – insisting that all species have a right

in The ecological eye
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Staging art and Chineseness
Jane Chin Davidson

paradise from James Hilton’s 1933 novel Lost Horizon. Through her video installation, Chang reproduces the film fantasy that Frank Capra interpreted for his 1937 movie version of Lost Horizon, the story of a plane crash in the Himalayas that led to the discovery of Shangri-La, an ethno-fantastic place of immortality run by a Buddhist lamasery. Through her conceptual video, Chang literally re-constructs the elements of lore from Capra’s Shangri-La while working with the community of Xianggelila to build the sculptural replica of the aweinspiring mountains made from angled

in Staging art and Chineseness
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Jane Roscoe and Craig Hight

-documentary (Graham 1998 ), and in fact the film’s theme offers some parallels to that of Frank Capra’s Mr Smith Goes to Washington (1939). The film as a whole works as a nostalgic fantasy of the possibility of the victory of a political underdog who is able to succeed against all the odds with a simplistic and often incoherent political platform, 12 hard work and a virtually non-existent campaign budget. Tuttle essentially represents a

in Faking it
Jane Chin Davidson

, for instance, Patty Chang’s 2005 video installation, Shangri-La, is an exploration of the subjects from Frank Capra’s 1937 movie Lost Horizon, based on James Hilton’s novel. Chang provides a clear contrast between the subject created for the movie and its representation through the conceptual methodology of video art. The discourse of Chineseness initiated in film theory has branched out to conceptual forms of representation, expressing metaphorically the instability of the loss of the discrete subject of identity, as digital expressions provide different methods

in Staging art and Chineseness
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Political, cultural, green
Andrew Patrizio

not mean that art is invisible or lost within the networks it moves around. Elements of the artwork remain, irreducibly, there. This leads neatly to our second term considered in this chapter, that of ‘interconnectivity’ as an ecocritical concept. The politics of interconnectivity The binding feature of ‘interconnectivity’ comes up often, particularly in what are called ‘deep ecology’ models (not quite the same as ‘dark green’) first named as such by Arne Naess, 23 and picked up by Fritjof Capra in The Tao of Physics (1975) and The Turning Point

in The ecological eye