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James Zborowski

solipsism’.110 Conclusion: Hitchcock, Capra, point of view and film studies The ‘lessons’ that I have suggested Deeds (and Deeds) offers are of value not only to the fictional Scottie Ferguson, but also to the real-life pursuit Point of view, consciousness, interaction  35 of academic film studies. I began this chapter by suggesting that we may sometimes have been led astray by a model of character consciousness developed by literary studies, for literature, which privileges invisible introspection, perhaps best exemplified by the work of Henry James. I would like to

in Classical Hollywood cinema
Point of view and communication
Author: James Zborowski

This book explores the theoretical and critical concept of filmic point of view. Its case studies are six acclaimed and accomplished instances of ‘classical Hollywood cinema’: Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (Capra, 1936), Only Angels Have Wings (Hawks, 1939), Letter from an Unknown Woman (Ophuls, 1948), Vertigo (Hitchcock, 1958), Anatomy of a Murder (Preminger, 1959), and The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (Ford, 1962). The book’s particular contributions to the study of filmic point of view are to use ‘communication’ as an idea which permits new ways of approaching this topic, and to offer detailed explorations of the filmic representation of character experience (including character ‘consciousness’ and interaction), and of the relationship of film to other media of communication (especially print media and the novel). With respect to character experience, it is argued that the often-held distinction between an inner realm of thought and feeling and an outer realm of behaviour and objects fails to do justice to the human experience of ‘being-in-the-world’ and film’s ability to represent it. With respect to film’s relationship to other media, it explores the traversing of the public, the private and the social that narrative fiction film represents, in a way that aligns the medium with the novel. The book is offered as a demonstration and defence of the value of a ‘conversational’ critical method that entails detailed scrutiny of our film-viewing experiences and of the language we use to describe those experiences, and eschews the construction of a taxonomy designed for general applicability.

Open Access (free)
Film festivals and the revival of Classic Hollywood
Julian Stringer

explain this phenomenon, consider the ‘Treasures from the Archive’ presentation of 1997. This series includes a short season on Frank Capra ‘in his centenary year’. 12 The three titles presented here are instructive in terms of the different ways in which ‘one of the greatest directors of Hollywood’s Golden Age’ (58) is being re-positioned for contemporary audiences. Readers

in Memory and popular film
Abstract only
Richard Rushton

things which can ‘only ever happen on film’. Films have nothing to do with our lives except inasmuch as they offer magical escapes from those lives, escapes for ‘their audiences’ (for such scholars it is always them, never me), fabricated by movies which ‘lie to us’ (so they lie not only to them, but also to us). And all this from a well respected film professor with an impressive curriculum vitae. The film being discussed in the above quotation is none other than Capra’s It Happened One Night, also examined in Chapter 4 above. There It Happened One Night was praised

in The reality of film
Composition and repetition in John Schlesinger’s Billy Liar
B. F. Taylor

time to time, when the sheer tragedy of what we see heightens the impact of a particular image. To this end, the dramatic revelation of Billy’s predicament brings to mind the situation George Bailey (James Stewart) faces in Frank Capra’s 1946 film It’s a Wonderful Life. Though worlds apart in terms of ambition, intention, reception, style and performance, both films feature characters whose private struggles with the day-to-dayness of their existence are revealed in the most public and painful of ways. Like the incident with the spotlight in Billy Liar, Capra’s film

in The British New Wave
Arthur Seaton and the arc of flight
B. F. Taylor

accompanied by the wish that he will leave home and see the world. In this example, and unlike Doreen, Mary also throws a stone and makes her own wish. The significance of Mary’s action is that she keeps her silence when George asks her what she wished for. Despite this, it is made quite clear that she wishes for George to stay where he is so that the two of them can settle down together. The connection between these two films cannot be pursued too strenuously but I am interested in the idea that the narrative of Capra’s film, like Reisz’s, appears to direct its central

in The British New Wave
Kathrina Glitre

with surprising bluntness (as in Me and My Gal (1932) and Advice to the Lovelorn (1933) ). Frank Capra’s Platinum Blonde (1931) is a particularly useful example, since, as Harvey observes, it ‘has almost all the elements of screwball comedy – the characters, the settings, the “madcap” stunts [. . .]. It has almost everything but the élan’ (1998: 118). The film’s journalist hero, Stew Smith (Robert Williams) marries society girl, Ann Schuyler (Jean Harlow), suggesting a template for It Happened One Night; however, the marriage is a disaster, and Stew ends up with his

in Hollywood romantic comedy States of the union, 1934–65
John Mundy and Glyn White

responsible for the successful innovations; it does not develop in a vacuum and in this instance stage comedy (for example, Noël Coward’s Private Lives (1931)) was an important influence that remains under-recognised. It is also clear that Hollywood wasn’t entirely sure how it had improved on this venerable tradition. The It Happened One Night director Frank Capra quoted collaborator Myles Connelly

in Laughing matters
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

juncture. Arguably, politics has been the worst of all pursuits for filmmakers throughout Hollywood’s history. The triumphant and insightful, not to say commercially successful, films in this genre often are perceived to be few and far between. For every Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939) there is a State of the Union (1948); for every The Manchurian Candidate (1962), a Seven Days in May (1964); and for every JFK there is a Nixon. However, each of these combinations are instructive: the first pair were directed by Frank Capra, the second by John Frankenheimer, and the

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
Pleasantville and the textuality of media memory
Paul Grainge

liberal fairytale about freedom and tolerance in the Frank Capra tradition’. 7 While the visual technique of Pleasantville was central to many favourable reviews, the type and degree of the film’s quotational referencing became a theme of critical concern, if not explicit complaint. The film invokes a gathering of cultural moments and movements under the aegis of a growing expressive creativity in

in Memory and popular film