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Race and the art of Agostino Brunias
Author: Mia L. Bagneris

Agostino Brunias's paintings have often been understood as straightforward documents of visual ethnography that functioned as field guides for reading race. This book offers the first comprehensive study of Agostino Brunias's intriguing pictures of colonial West Indians of colour made for colonial officials and plantocratic elites during the late-eighteenth century. It talks about the so called 'Red' and 'Black' Caribs, dark-skinned Africans and Afro-Creoles, and mixed-race women and men. The book explores the role of the artist's paintings in reifying notions of race in the British colonial Caribbean and considers how the images both reflected and refracted common ideas about race. Although some historians argue that the conclusion of the First Carib War actually amounted to a stalemate, Brunias clearly documents it as a moment of surrender, with Joseph Chatoyer considering the terms of his people's submission. Young's Account of the Black Charaibs mobilised subtle and not-so-subtle allusions to the rebellion in Haiti to construct a narrative of the Carib Wars. The book analyses the imaging of Africans and Afro-Creoles in British colonial art. The painting named Mulatresses and Negro Woman Bathing, Brunias replaces his more quotidian trade scenes and negro dancing frolics with a bathing tableau set against a sylvan Eden. In Linen Market, Dominica, one arresting figure captivates the viewer more than any other. Brunias may have painted for the plantocractic class, constructing pretty pictures of Caribbean life that reflected the vision of the islands upon which white, colonialist identities depended.

The afterlife of Brunias’s imagery
Mia L. Bagneris

Coda – Pushing Brunias’s buttons, or rebranding the plantocracy’s painter: the afterlife of Brunias’s imagery In 1949 New York City’s Cooper-Hewitt Design Museum, one of nineteen national museums that comprise the Smithsonian Institution, acquired a set of eighteen remarkable painted buttons (fig. 58).1 Measuring just under an inch and half in diameter – large for buttons but terrifically tiny for p ­ aintings2 – each of these extraordinary fasteners features a Caribbean scene painted in gouache on thin canvas affixed to an ivory backing and protected by a glass

in Colouring the Caribbean
Mixed-race Venuses and Vixens as the fruits of imperial enterprise
Mia L. Bagneris

3 Brown-skinned booty, or colonising Diana: mixed-race Venuses and Vixens as the fruits of imperial enterprise Housed in the storage tombs of Harvard University’s Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnography is one of Agostino Brunias’s more fascinating pictures. The intimately scaled painting features four nude women seeking refuge from the steamy heat of the Caribbean, bathing in a shallow stream under the canopy of an abundant tree. In many ways a rather conventional bathing image, this depiction of a ubiquitous theme of Western art by a painter of little

in Colouring the Caribbean
Abstract only
Mia L. Bagneris

in the right margin of the picture, nestled against the calm, crystal waters of the Caribbean Sea. However, in the midst of this quintessential tropical splendour, two figures in the foreground, a man and a woman, command the viewer’s immediate attention. Although he is dressed to beat the heat, the man manages to cut an impressive figure in long white trousers, white shirt, and white waistcoat – all immaculately spotless. He accessorises the outfit with black cravat, black shoes with silver buckles, and a long mustard-coloured dress coat with shiny gold buttons

in Colouring the Caribbean
Brunias’s ‘ladies’ of ambiguous race
Mia L. Bagneris

face, modest décolleté, and delicate hands, she is made to stand out in the crowd of a busy Caribbean marketplace by the bright pink parasol that shades her from the sun. The sunshade is held aloft by a female attendant whose dark skin, like the umbrella, highlights the pale beauty of her mistress. In her essay ‘Taxonomy and Agency in Brunias’s West Indian Paintings’, Beth Fowkes Tobin analyses this scene, highlighting the presence of the figure in white by comparing her with two other women. In contrast to a ‘dramatically dressed mulatto woman’, Tobin describes the

in Colouring the Caribbean
John M. MacKenzie

continents, although in the Rhodesian (Zimbabwean) case of the 1890s, for example, ‘Fort Salisbury’ and ‘Fort Victoria’ were intended more for psychological effect than to indicate the building of genuine forts in the old style.2 Forts could be found everywhere in the British Empire, as in other empires. Indeed such forts often went through a continual process of being taken and retaken or exchanged. Perhaps the classic case is the Caribbean and its essential connection with West Africa. The slave trade was conducted from a whole sequence of castles and forts on the West

in The British Empire through buildings
John M. MacKenzie

, Corio Villa, ordered in the early 1850s from the Edinburgh firm of Charles D. Young and Company, was erected in Geelong in 1856 and survives to this day.47 Of greater significance in the creation of a distinctive colonial architecture was the export (and eventually the local manufacture) of highly decorative cast-iron railings, gates, balconies, verandahs, balusters and balustrades which became almost ubiquitous in colonial shops and houses. This became a major fashion from the mid-nineteenth until the early twentieth century, still apparent throughout the Caribbean

in The British Empire through buildings
Rethinking art, media, and the audio-visual contract
Author: Ming-Yuen S. Ma

There is no soundtrack is a specific yet expansive study of sound tactics deployed in experimental media art today. It analyses how audio and visual elements interact and produce meaning, drawing from works by contemporary media artists ranging from Chantal Akerman, to Nam June Paik, to Tanya Tagaq. It then links these analyses to discussions on silence, voice, noise, listening, the soundscape, and other key ideas in sound studies. In making these connections, the book argues that experimental media art – avant-garde film, video art, performance, installation, and hybrid forms – produces radical and new audio-visual relationships that challenge and destabilize the visually-dominated fields of art history, contemporary art criticism, cinema and media studies, and cultural studies as well as the larger area of the human sciences. This book directly addresses what sound studies scholar Jonathan Sterne calls ‘visual hegemony’. It joins a growing body of interdisciplinary scholarship that is collectively sonifying the study of culture while defying the lack of diversity within the field by focusing on practitioners from transnational and diverse backgrounds. Therefore, the media artists discussed in this book are of interest to scholars and students who are exploring aurality in related disciplines including gender and feminist studies, queer studies, ethnic studies, postcolonial studies, urban studies, environmental analysis, and architecture. As such, There Is No Soundtrack makes meaningful connections between previously disconnected bodies of scholarship to build new, more complex and reverberating frameworks for the study of art, media, and sound.

Representing Africans and Afro-Creoles in the Anglo-American world
Mia L. Bagneris

, boasts a fascinating association with the supreme hero of the Haitian Revolution, Toussaint L’Ouverture. This connection exists in the form of eighteen intriguing hand-painted buttons, emblazoned with Brunias’s imagery depicting Caribbeans of various colours in scenes of daily life, that are said to have adorned the coat of the historic black leader. I explore the legend of the buttons, their relationship to L’Ouverture, and their larger implications for thinking about Brunias’s oeuvre in the coda to this book. For now, however, it suffices to say that much like the

in Colouring the Caribbean
Abstract only
The material and visual culture of the Stuart Courts, 1589–1619
Author: Jemma Field

This book analyses Anna of Denmark’s material and visual patronage at the Stuart courts, examining her engagement with a wide array of expressive media including architecture, garden design, painting, music, dress, and jewellery. Encompassing Anna’s time in Denmark, England, and Scotland, it establishes patterns of interest and influence in her agency, while furthering our knowledge of Baltic-British transfer in the early modern period. Substantial archival work has facilitated a formative re-conceptualisation of James and Anna’s relationship, extended our knowledge of the constituents of consortship in the period, and has uncovered evidence to challenge the view that Anna followed the cultural accomplishments of her son, Prince Henry. This book reclaims Anna of Denmark as the influential and culturally active royal woman that her contemporaries knew. Combining politics, culture, and religion across the courts of Denmark, Scotland, and England, it enriches our understanding of royal women’s roles in early modern patriarchal societies and their impact on the development of cultural modes and fashions. This book will be of interest to upper level undergraduate and postgraduate students taking courses on early modern Europe in the disciplines of Art and Architectural History, English Literature, Theatre Studies, History, and Gender Studies. It will also attract a wide range of academics working on early modern material and visual culture, and female patronage, while members of the public who enjoy the history of courts and the British royals will also find it distinctively appealing.