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The Batavia leprosy asylum in the age of slavery
Stephen Snelders

a working relationship between the colonial state and the Roman Catholic Church. This was possible because of the ambivalence in governmental policies regarding the management of the Batavia asylum. The vast majority of the sufferers in the asylum were a special category of slaves; they were unproductive. Since the slaves only cost the government money, it was unwilling to invest resources in the asylum. For instance, although the asylum was established in 1824, medical services were only provided in the 1850s. To provide support and sustenance for the sufferers

in Leprosy and colonialism
Jacques Gélis

were rarely known outside very circumscribed places of devotion. The French Catholic Church did not encourage these expressions of popular worship, considering them dubious practices and even attempting to suppress them.9 But it was to no avail, so strong was the popular attachment to these minor local saints. Disorders of the guts provoked extreme anxiety: people particularly feared the infantile diarrhoea that struck very young children every summer and dehydrated them; a woman in childbirth could encounter terrible difficulties if her pelvis proved to be too

in Bellies, bowels and entrails in the eighteenth century
Abstract only
Mary Donnelly and Claire Murray

development of more considered and ethically informed laws, policies and practices. DONNELLY 9780719099465 PRINT.indd 5 12/10/2015 15:59 6 Ethical and legal debates in Irish healthcare References Barrington, R. (2002) ‘Terrible beauty or Celtic mouse? The research agenda in Ireland’, New Hibernia Review, 6: 138. Hesketh, T. (1990) The Second Partitioning of Ireland?: The Abortion Referendum of 1983. Dublin: Brandsma Books. Inglis, T. (1998) Moral Monopoly: The Rise and Fall of the Catholic Church in Modern Ireland, 2nd edn. Dublin: University College Press. Lyons, B

in Ethical and legal debates in Irish healthcare
Reorganizing leprosy care, 1890– 1900
Stephen Snelders

example of public–​ private partnership going far beyond the cooperation of the colonial state and the Roman Catholic Church in Batavia. Wulfingh agreed to take in any leprosy sufferer in Majella sent there by the government. He also agreed that non-​Catholic patients would not be addressed on religious issues. In return, he would receive 100 guilders per year for each patient.51 15 Reorganizing leprosy care, 1890–1900155 In July 1896, the Medical Committee inspected Majella and concluded that the situation was satisfactory and that there was no danger of leprosy

in Leprosy and colonialism
Abstract only
Historicising a ‘revolution’
Julian M. Simpson

British healthcare workers—​be they doctors, nurses or administrators—​who returned to work in the NHS. Undertaking such a task in the context of the NHS could contribute to highlighting the importance of asking such questions about the impact of migration on the mainstream in other contexts. How for instance have Irish priests and Polish worshippers shaped the development of the Catholic Church in Britain? What part have migrant fruit pickers played in the development of British agriculture? How has low paid migrant labour contributed to making London the city that it

in Migrant architects of the NHS
Catherine Cox

, influential merchants and traders, representatives of the Church of Ireland and the Roman Catholic Church, and after 1838, poor law guardians. In 1852 the lunacy inspectors were appointed ex-officio governors of all asylums. Larcom insisted that the inspectors were ‘a medium of communication’ between local asylum boards and parliament while ‘the real control of each asylum rests in its board of governors.’99 However, it is clear that the inspectors took part in proceedings of ordinary business at meetings and this caused tension.100 The arrangement was later altered and the

in Negotiating insanity in the southeast of Ireland, 1820–1900
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Joris Vandendriessche

. Its origins as a nation-state lay in the 1830 revolt of the southern parts of the United Kingdom of the Netherlands against the policies of King William I. The new state was built upon a political compromise between an upcoming industrial bourgeoisie and the Catholic Church. Both shared a profound distrust of state intervention. To prevent the state (or the monarch) from interfering in their respective economic and religious programs, profound liberal freedoms were included in the new and highly progressive constitution of 1831. This spirit of liberalism also helped

in Medical societies and scientific culture in nineteenth-century Belgium
A feminist analysis of the Neary and Halappanavar cases
Joan McCarthy

in resistance. The second part of the chapter highlighted how clinical decision-­making in relation to women’s reproductive choices can be infused by Catholic ideology­– ­this time through the ambiguity and interpretation of Irish laws on the permissibility of abortion. It also pointed to the marginalisation of the views, values and preferences of pregnant women in decisions that impact on their lives and the excessive obligations that pregnant women in Ireland are legally required to meet compared with other people. While it is clear that the Catholic Church

in Ethical and legal debates in Irish healthcare
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Examining Ireland’s failure to regulate embryonic stem cell research
Ciara Staunton

the Catholic Church who teach that the embryo must be protected from conception (Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, 2008). Under such doctrines, it is professed that humans are made in God’s image and this extends to the embryo. It is irrelevant that an increased understanding of the developmental process of an embryo has shown that the embryo does not in fact resemble a human being, as it is believed that ‘no amount of embryological investigation could conceivably crack what is held to be an awesome mystery’ (Evans, 1996: 31). Others who favour the

in Ethical and legal debates in Irish healthcare
Abstract only
Catherine Cox

, 25:2 (1983), 339–374; P. P. Boyle and C. Ó Gráda, ‘Fertility Trends, Excess Mortality and the Great Irish Famine’, Demography, 23:4 (1986), 543–562; R. Breen, ‘Dowry Payments and the Irish Case’, Comparative Studies in Society and History, 26:2 (1984), 280–296; T. Inglis, Moral Monopoly: The Rise and Fall of the Catholic Church in Ireland (Dublin: University College Dublin Press, 1998). 35 P. E. Prestwich, ‘Family Strategies and Medical Power: Voluntary Committal in a Parisian Asylum, 1876–1914’, Journal of Social History, 27 (1993–1994), 799–818. 36 Porter

in Negotiating insanity in the southeast of Ireland, 1820–1900