Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 101 items for :

  • "Catholic Church" x
  • Manchester Literature Studies x
Clear All
Abstract only
McGahern’s personal and detached reflections

rural to urban society and the decline in the importance of the Catholic Church in everyday life. McGahern reveals what it was like to make love and have sex in Ireland during the shift from a Catholic culture of selfdenial to a modern, urban, cosmopolitan culture of self-fulfilment and self-indulgence. love and sex  111 It is possible to think of McGahern as one of the major chroniclers of cultural change in twentieth-century Ireland. However, while he accepted this description of himself, he emphasised that he was not trying to give an objective, detached

in John McGahern
Abstract only

. This abuse did not represent a failure of the system but was endemic to it; as Ryan observes, ‘abuse occurred in the Institutions’ and ‘the Institutions in themselves were abusive’.3 Likewise, the three reports on the failure of the Catholic Church to adequately confront the sexual abuse of children by some of its priests, along with the testimony of their victims, have thoroughly discredited the Irish Catholic Church as an authority on human sexuality.4 Throughout the twentieth century, as Ursula Barry and Clair Wills note, ‘the Catholic Church in Ireland played a

in Impure thoughts
Marie Helena Loughlin

spiritual and political authority of the Roman Catholic Church, English Protestant reformists often seized on sodomy as a highly charged and emotive anti-papal discourse, with female homoerotic sexual acts sometimes appearing as well. Perhaps the most famous of these reformists, the playwright, bishop and controversialist John Bale, attacked Catholicism’s mandatory ecclesiastical celibacy as a trigger and veil for all kinds of sexual excesses; he claimed, as many reformists did, that Catholic celibacy for priests and other religious was unnatural, and encouraged men and

in Same-Sex Desire in Early Modern England, 1550–1735
Abstract only
Treason and betrayal in six modern Irish novels

This book argues that modern Irish history encompasses a deep-seated fear of betrayal, and that this fear has been especially prevalent throughout Irish society since the revolutionary period at the outset of the twentieth century. The author goes on to argue that the novel is the literary form most apt for the exploration of betrayal in its social, political and psychological dimensions. The significance of this thesis comes into focus in terms of a number of recent developments – most notably, the economic downturn (and the political and civic betrayals implicated therein) and revelations of the Catholic Church’s failure in its pastoral mission. As many observers note, such developments have brought the language of betrayal to the forefront of contemporary Irish life. After an introductory section in which he considers betrayal from a variety of religious, psychological and literary perspectives, Gerry Smyth goes on to analyse the Irish experience of betrayal: firstly through a case study of one of the country’s most beloved legends – Deirdre of the Sorrows; and secondly, through extended discussion of six powerful Irish novels in which ideas of betrayal feature centrally - from adultery in James Joyce’s Ulysses, touting in Liam O’Flaherty’s The Informer and spying Elizabeth Bowen’s The Heat of the Day, through to writing itself in Francis Stuart’s Black List, Section H, murder in Eugene McCabe’s Death and Nightingales and child abuse in Anne Enright’s The Gathering (2007). This book offers a powerful analysis of modern Irish history as regarded from the perspective of some its most incisive minds.

The educational vision of John McGahern

assessment. Education takes place in multiple contexts and, as will be clear from this essay, McGahern enjoyed many experiences that were educative in a more general sense. So, apart from institutions of formal, organised learning, important sources of informal education were nature and farming, individuals within the community and the Catholic Church. McGahern offers readers a richly realised vision of how all of these sources, formal and informal, shaped his identity. Sensitivity to the multiple contexts in which learning takes place is an important aspect of his writing

in John McGahern
Abstract only

some ignorant or crass remark had inflamed his sensibility, there was almost an incantatory tone to his speech. It was even a little ‘sung’ from time to time, like a chant, and more often than not streaming with quotations from his several cherished writers – Proust, Flaubert, Joyce, Beckett, Yeats… They and so many others embellished all his conversation. Often they were his conversation. It all went back to the primary intention to be a priest and, however fully he had shaken off the skin of the observances and ceremonies of the Catholic Church, there was little

in John McGahern

been ‘corrupted’ by time in India and through their maintenance of ties with Britain (they spend two months of each year with their daughter in Durham, listen to the BBC World Service, wear Burberry and retain the Colonel’s British Army contacts); by contrast, the local Catholics are saved from ‘corrupting foreign influence’ (239) by the Catholic Church, which warns them against ‘alien’ customs and ideas and which encourages the study of the Irish language as an effective barrier against the sullying effects of transnational Anglophone culture. By chance, the

in John McGahern
Liam O’Flaherty’s The Informer (1925)

Inishmore; identification, and subsequent disillusionment, with the Catholic Church (although not necessarily the faith); over two years of front-line experience in the army of Ireland’s traditional enemy in the most terrible war in history, for which he ‘was regarded as a pariah and a fool and a renegade’ (O’Flaherty 1934: 21); a year of 94 The Judas kiss (successful) physical and (incomplete) mental convalescence; two years of global wandering; growing fascination with the worldwide revolutionary movement; and return to a country that was ‘divided and factionalized

in The Judas kiss
Abstract only

’s opening paragraphs: ‘he savour[ed] the walk down streets he had cycled and scooted along for over three decades’ (2009: 115). As he does so, he notes the city’s evolving demographic and architecture: ‘He noted that the Roman Catholic church and its primary school on Montgomery Road had disappeared, joining the quaint little National Westminster Bank branch that had been in the middle of Beresford Road with a communal vegetable plot at the back. That had been pulled down twenty-odd years ago’ (2009:115). It is this sense of long-standing intimacy with the city’s streets

in Postcolonial Manchester
Abstract only
Betrayal and the Irish novel

, meantime, was the spectre of another high-profile modern Irish ‘betrayal’ – that of its constituents by the Catholic Church. By the second decade of the new century, in fact, the words ‘Irish’ and ‘betrayal’ had become closely linked – one never too far from the other when questions of identity, meaning or value were at issue. What does the emergence of ‘betrayal’ as a prominent theme within modern Irish life signify?1 To begin to address that question 2 Introduction we must (unsurprisingly) turn to the past, or at least to ‘the past’ as it’s imagined in various

in The Judas kiss