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David Clare

struggles with mental illness, the Catholic women who have endeavoured to imitate her throughout the story retreat into their comfortable, bourgeois, ‘pre-Flora’ existence. This comes across as an endorsement of ‘sensible’ middle-class living over the sophisticated but eccentric Big House freedom personified by Flora. Likewise, in Lavin’s ‘Scylla and Charybdis’ (1956), it is suggested that the members of the former Ascendancy will never accept an Irish Catholic as a social equal, and that no amount of education will enable Catholics to fully participate 88  john mcgahern

in John McGahern
Byron and Italian Catholicism
Bernard Beatty

This chapter documents the evolution of Byron’s personal and poetic relationship with Catholicism from what was presumably his first real encounter with it at Newstead Abbey in 1798 through to the final cantos of Don Juan and the figure of Aurora Raby. Detailing and exploring Byron’s experience of Italian friars, priests, cardinal legates, a pope and, most importantly, Italian Catholic women, the chapter suggests that, in Catholic Italy, spiritually, Byron found ‘something sensible to grasp at’. Ranging across Byron’s poetic career, the chapter sees the poet begin as a John Knox in response to Catholicism but progressively become not only a thinker of theological precision but also a ‘sympathetic outsider’ and, indeed, even an insider to Italian Catholic experience

in Byron and Italy
Catholicism, gender and race in two novels by Louise Erdrich
Sinéad Moynihan

In her work on Catholic women writers, Jeana DelRosso identifies Louise Erdrich as one of several writers who address ‘the conflicts between Catholicism and their individual cultures with an internally divided attitude … that is informed in part by the fact that Catholicism was imported into those cultures through colonialism.’ 27 In Tracks and The Last Report, Erdrich makes the Catholic clergy the starting point for her interrogation of whether Catholicism’s colonialist function necessarily distances it irreconcilably from Native beliefs, or if the two might

in Passing into the present
Abstract only
‘Un paese tutto poetico’ – Byron in Italy, Italy in Byron
Alan Rawes and Diego Saglia

. Detailing and exploring Byron’s experience of Italian friars, priests, cardinal legates, a pope and, most importantly, Italian Catholic women, Beatty suggests that, in Catholic Italy, ‘spiritually, Byron found something sensible to grasp at’. Ranging across Byron’s poetic career, Beatty sees the poet begin as a John Knox in response to Catholicism but progressively become not only a thinker of ‘theological precision’ but also a ‘sympathetic outsider and even insider’ to Italian Catholic experience. Rather than approaching Byron’s much-​ discussed engagement with the early

in Byron and Italy
Michael G. Cronin

history. O’Brien had made a similar journey to Mary’s when she worked as a ‘Miss’ and an English literature tutor to the son and daughter of a wealthy family near the Basque city of Bilbao in 1922 and 1923.55 As the ‘Prologue’ to the novel suggests, it was a journey made by many young Irish Catholic women of her class and generation.56 Perhaps because of this encounter with the country in her formative years, Spain is the country outside of Ireland O’Brien returned to most often in her writing. Besides Mary Lavelle and That THE EROTIC S OF LIBERAL CATHOLIC DISSENT 97

in Impure thoughts