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Abstract only
Edward Ashbee

, both Santorum and Huckabee sought to navigate the divide between the white working-class electorate and the ‘culture wars’ politics of the Christian right. They spoke in quasi-populist terms and pointed to the impact of economic forces on traditional working-class communities while at the same time highlighting and campaigning around moral issues. Populist discourses The increasing weight of the white working class within the Republican Party's constituencies, the shallowly embedded character of the three strands that defined US conservatism, and the visible but

in The Trump revolt
Edward Tomarken

involves the relationship between what is called the ‘Christian right’, a minority but powerful interest group, and the political party of the president, who is a Democrat. Josh has insulted a key member of this religious group, a woman named Mary Marsh (Annie Corley), who takes exception to Josh’s reference to God, asserting that she does not worship the same deity. Josh replies: ‘Your God is busy being indicted for tax fraud.’ The problem is that the Christian right includes important supporters of the president, and the last thing he wants is for any of his people to

in Why theory?
Parties and interest groups
Edward Ashbee

or the Christian right. They were brought into the political arena by developments during the 1970s such as the secularisation of education and successive Supreme Court rulings (particularly Roe v. Wade in 1973). Their campaigns have focused on calls for moral traditionalism and family values. In particular, they hoped to outlaw abortion and counter efforts to represent homosexuality and heterosexuality as moral equivalents. Given that the judiciary have played a critical part in shaping the laws regulating moral

in US politics today (fourth edition)
Nicole Vitellone

1999 there was a sharp decrease in the discussion of condoms in classrooms as effective in preventing HIV and other diseases. Much of the critique of condom use came from Christian right research institutes that infiltrated sexuality research and produced misleading statistics and data on condoms. ‘Conservatives charged that there are tiny (five micron) holes in condoms that 26 Object matters sperm are too big to penetrate but through which the HIV virus could pass’ (Irvine, 2002: 116). Alongside this there was a proliferation of misleading information on condom

in Object matters
Abstract only
Nicole Vitellone

’s story of condoms and consent denied? And why does Brown’s story of non-consent not include the condom? Irvine’s (2002) history of sex education in the US classroom provides some preliminary answers. Drawing from the work of Austin, How to Do Things with Words (1975) and Butler’s work Excitable Speech (1997), Irvine addresses the impact of the Christian right in opposing comprehensive sex education and Condoms and consent 121 campaigning for an abstinence-only curriculum. Opponents of sex education mobilised claims about speech as performative and as having a

in Object matters