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John Anderson

world, some of which were undergoing political transition. One was the rise, fall and rise of the so-called Christian Right in the USA which sought to change the American political agenda and that has, under President George W. Bush, seen its discourse become more widely accepted and its influence seemingly grow in the domestic and foreign policy thinking of a Republican administration. Whilst critics claimed that this revitalised movement was in danger of subverting American liberties and undermining the traditional separation of Church and

in Christianity and democratisation
John Anderson

The impact of global Pentecostalism on democratisation is almost as hotly debated as the influence of the Christian Right on the American polity, and in some analyses the two movements are seen as connected. Initial studies tended to assume that Pentecostals were politically conservative and quiescent, inclined to other-worldly values that simply accepted the political order in the countries where they lived and worshipped. Several writers pointed to the support that Pentecostal leaders offered to General Pinochet in Chile, or to the

in Christianity and democratisation
Abstract only
John Anderson

returned to look at the impact of a revitalised Protestantism as represented by the predominantly evangelical Christian Right in the USA and the rapidly expanding global Pentecostal movement. In both cases we pointed to ambiguities, as religious leaders sometimes promoted illiberal policy agendas, yet the very fact of participating in politics often forced them to engage in the sort of bargaining and compromise that are an essential feature of democracy. Simultaneously, their followers often gained considerable experience in negotiating, organising and leading, all

in Christianity and democratisation
Abstract only
John Anderson

). Meanwhile, in the North American ‘home of democracy’ the question of the ‘proper’ relationship between religion and politics came to the fore again, in part as a consequence of the rise of the Christian Right and its revitalisation during the presidency of George W. Bush. In 2004 Samuel Huntington raised the question of whether America’s Anglo-Protestant culture was being undermined by multiculturalism and whether her democratic ‘civilisation’ could survive once these ideological roots were knocked away ( Chapter 7 ). Simultaneously, new challenges for democracy were

in Christianity and democratisation
Jonathan Benthall

tradition.) Cook identifies partial non-Muslim parallels: as regards the increase in religiosity, in the rise of Pentecostalism and Charismatic Catholicism; as regards identity politics, in the Hindutva nationalist movement; as regards the imposition of social values, in the mainstream Christian Right in the United States; as regards the campaign to restore the Caliphate, in a Christian

in Islamic charities and Islamic humanism in troubled times
John Anderson

end apartheid and mobilised church opinion in favour of the campaign for majority rule. In pursuit of these causes it was joined by various other Protestant groups, including the World Alliance of Reformed Churches which in 1982 condemned apartheid as heresy and in the early 1990s supported Malawi’s Presbyterian Church leaders in their campaign for human rights in Malawi. 19 Other Protestant groups were more wary of political involvement, with most evangelical groups adopting a more quietist approach. In the USA, however, the Christian Right was actively involved

in Christianity and democratisation