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Lindsey Dodd

the threat, while Édith’s mother downplayed it. The frequency of alerts required creative solutions at school. The teachers at Bernard Lemaire’s school in Lille got tired of interruptions, and so ‘they set up classrooms in the basement’. Many schools did not have cellars. For Sonia Agache in Hellemmes, the shelters were ‘behind the school in the park [where] they’d dug some trenches’, whereas Josette Dutilleul, elsewhere in Hellemmes, went ‘under the church where they’d strutted the cellars’. In Aulnoye, Jean Denhez said his teacher ‘made us leave the school and lie

in French children under the Allied bombs, 1940–45
Madeleine Leonard

instances where this was not the case. Moreover, there may have been instances of pupils who attended schools in interface areas but did not live in the immediate interface area. Using questionnaires While questionnaires are often avoided in research with young people, more interactive and creative methods being favoured, this study found the questionnaire to be a

in Teens and territory in ‘post-conflict’ Belfast
Stephen Benedict Dyson

’ experience in Afghanistan – the iconic image of which was special operatives on horseback acting as spotters for laser-guided missiles – made him a convert. Rumsfeld moulded Franks into a general who was creative in terms of doctrine and from whom he could expect a constructive reaction to questions. Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, who as a member of the Defence Policy Board knew both men and observed

in Leaders in conflict
Abstract only
Sandra Buchanan

concept of cultural violence, defined as ‘those aspects of culture … that can be used to justify or legitimize direct or structural violence’. 8 Innovatively, Galtung defined peace as ‘nonviolent and creative conflict transformation … to know about peace we have to know about conflict and how conflicts can be transformed, both nonviolently and creatively’. 9 Until Galtung

in Transforming conflict through social and economic development
Josefina A. Echavarria

differentiation of distantiation of one group from another does not require that their relationship be one of violence’ (Campbell, 1998: 70). Danger can be experienced ‘positively as well as negatively: it can be a creative force, “a call to being”, that provides access to the world’ (ibid.: 81). In a similar tone, Edward Said (2003a: xxix) calls attention to the ‘slow working together of cultures that overlap

in In/security in Colombia
Sandra Buchanan

regulations and EU jurisdiction over US money. The evidence presented has also highlighted the importance of local consultation and the inclusion of the most disadvantaged and marginalised if the root causes of conflict are to be tackled. However, while local conditions should determine specific actions, central guidelines are necessary to ensure the generation of creative actions while

in Transforming conflict through social and economic development
Charlotte Heath-Kelly

Annan himself admitted, this extension and repetition of action involves a paradox: ‘Ladies and Gentlemen, we confront a paradox. Despite a decade of dedicated and creative effort by IDNDR and its collaborators, the number and cost of natural disasters continues to rise. The cost of weather related disasters in 1998 alone exceeded the cost of all such disasters in the whole of the 1980s’ (Annan 1999

in Death and security
Abstract only
Madeleine Leonard

creative production of identity (Cresswell, 2004 ). It becomes a backdrop to the shaping of local, regional and national identities. While identities are multiple and dynamic, nonetheless, they emerge within and from place and impact on the past, present and future (Casey, 1993 ). Paying attention to the place-rooted dimension of identity construction is a core underlying feature of this book’s framework

in Teens and territory in ‘post-conflict’ Belfast
Sandra Buchanan

and cultural. However, each will continually enable and reinforce the other providing ‘recognition that there are different ways of dealing with conflicts and that violence is only one possible approach … vital if we are to search and find more creative, more constructive and more viable approaches to dealing with conflict’. 18 In distinguishing conflict from violence

in Transforming conflict through social and economic development
Managing the great power relations trilemma
Graeme P. Herd

minority entrepreneurial and creative class unable to function at home in the face of a state-sponsored ‘sovereign democracy’ ideology morphed into triumphalist conservative nationalism, in the context of an ongoing chronic state of emergency. Second, Russia has instrumentalised the Ukrainian crisis to consolidate its wider conception of an alternative conservative national

in Violence and the state