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Dolto and the psychoanalytic approach to autism in France
Richard Bates

6 ). Oury and Guattari turned La Borde into a humane, egalitarian community, in deliberate contrast to the repressive, carceral atmosphere of most asylums. La Borde’s nurses did not wear white smocks, but dressed indistinguishably from the patients. Spaces were permeable and patients free to move around. Patients ran group therapy sessions and creative projects themselves, and were brought into the centre’s decision-making processes. Guattari, in charge of work schedules, constantly assigned staff to work outside

in Psychoanalysis and the family in twentieth-century France
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Popularising psychoanalysis, 1945–68
Richard Bates

importance of consulting psychological experts on such issues. At one point, Pére Larère cited a 1929 papal encyclical on education, which, he claimed, ‘expressly asked Christian parents to undertake [sexual] education in good time … I turn to Doctor Dolto-Marette so that she can tell us at what age we can begin that education.’ 53 This was a creative reading of Pius XI’s text, which in fact condemned ‘the error of those who with dangerous assurance and under an ugly term propagate a so-called sex-education, falsely imagining they

in Psychoanalysis and the family in twentieth-century France
Conversations within and across South Asia
Sushmita Chatterjee, Deboleena Roy, and Banu Subramaniam

-economy of Hinduism are central to this conversation. What is happening through this novel branding of ‘archaic modernity’? When science, religion, and modernity are orchestrated in a seamless choreography, who profits in this marketplace of values, goods, and bodies? Hinduism serves many purposes and is bestowed with varied possibilities as religion, civilisation, political-economy, and morality structure. Tulasi Srinivas, for example, invokes the term ‘experimental Hinduism’ to write about ‘a whole world of iterative, strategic, and creative improvisations within and

in Birth controlled
Sophie Vasset

scandal’, she shifts the common perception of gossip as destructive and uncaring to underline its creative and bonding qualities. Patricia Meyer Spacks quotes from Jane Austen's last completed novel, Persuasion , to illustrate the ways in which gossip fosters intimacy, and establishes ‘a mode not of domination but of linkage’. 2 Needless to say, this pleasurable gossip happens in Bath. The gossiping skills under study belong to Nurse Rooke, a character in Persuasion already mentioned in relation to

in Murky waters
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Sophie Vasset

contexts such as The Cheltenham guide; or, Memoirs of the B-n-r-d family continued , another example of the ongoing cultural dialogue between Bath and other spas. 95 The canonical eighteenth-century novels dealing with British spas in the second part of the eighteenth century should be placed in this wider context of spa literature. Smollett's Humphry Clinker , Austen's Persuasion and Northanger Abbey , and Burney's Evelina stem out of a wider culture of playful and creative

in Murky waters
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Sophie Vasset

the pharmacopoeia of the time, often prescribed for chronic diseases and complex symptoms, and sometimes for desperate cases. Taking the medical aspect of spas at face value is essential to understand the complexity of watering places, their development and their role in the culture of the times. Otherwise, the easy and rather monolithic narrative of ‘the commercialisation of leisure’ takes over, and the long and difficult history of sick bodies, water-drinking, bathing and creative modes of care gets swallowed into a blurred vision of what is too often reduced to

in Murky waters
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Watering places and the money business
Sophie Vasset

that the poor, who would ‘come flocking’ to take the waters for their health, would have to be kept apart from the bon ton , who happened to come for the same reason, so that the reputation of the spa would be maintained. I will explore, at the end of this chapter, the ways in which the juxtaposition of the two was dealt with and represented in contemporary literature. High stakes In the creative 1732 issue of The Scarborough Miscellany , a familiar reference at this stage, a mock-heroic poem entitled

in Murky waters
Dolto, psychoanalysis and Catholicism from Occupation to Liberation
Richard Bates

. Resisters could thus be sheltered by sympathetic factory managers. Luc-André Brunet details creative measures taken by steel bosses to protect underemployed workers in Forging Europe: Industrial Organisation in France, 1940–1952 (London: Palgrave, 2017). 78 Suzanne Marette to Dolto, 12 August 1943, Une vie de correspondances , pp. 113–14, and n. 22. 79 Françoise Dolto’s 1988 preface to Boris Dolto, Le Corps entre les mains (1976) (Paris: Vuibert, 2006

in Psychoanalysis and the family in twentieth-century France
Dorothy Porter

Parkinson's Disease – evident in other manifestations of neurology 11 – this chapter also explores an alternative, and equally ancient, narrative of balance about the dualism of creative genius. Roy Porter used William Blake's lament about the ‘mind forg'd manacles’ of the creative imagination to epitomise the eighteenth-century European Enlightenment's mirror of reason and madness. 12 My task here is to examine how balancing drug reception in the brain is bound to the

in Balancing the self

Using oral, archival and written sources, the book reconstructs the experiences of African women and men working in Zimbabwe’s hospitals in the twentieth century. It demonstrates how African nurses, i.e., nursing assistants, nursing orderlies, medics and State Registered Nurses were the spine of the hospital system and through their work ensured the smooth functioning of hospitals in Zimbabwe. The book argues that African nurses took the opportunity afforded to them by the profession to transform Zimbabwe’s clinical spaces into their own. They were interlocutors between white medical and nursing personnel and African patients and made Africans’ adjustments to hospital settings easier. At the same time, the book moves beyond hospital spaces, interrogating the significance of the nursing profession within African communities, in the process bridging the divide between public and private spaces. The book makes a significant contribution to global nursing historiography by highlighting how Zimbabwean nurses’ experiences within hospitals and beyond clinical spaces speak to the experiences of other nurses within the Southern African region and beyond. Through documenting the stories and histories of African nurses over a period of a century and the various ways in which they struggled and creatively adapted to their subordinate position in hospitals and how they transformed these healing spaces to make them their own, the book suggests that nurses were important historical actors whose encounters and experiences in Zimbabwe’s healing spaces – the hospitals – deserve to be documented.