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the presence of a lunar manifestation on a right, solar eye. However, the occurrence of a male lion as the embodiment of a goddess would still need to be explained. In the Heliopolitan cosmogony Tefnut and her partner Shu, as the children of the sun-god, were sometimes represented as a pair of lions; it was in this form that they were worshipped at Leontopolis in the Delta (Kees 1977: 7): here, perhaps, is to be found the explanation. But, with even greater possibility, since Tefnut’s savage nature could be illustrated only by a maned lion’s head on a woman’s body

in Mummies, magic and medicine in ancient Egypt
Curatorial bodies, encounters and relations

-cultural relationships and encompasses encounters between people and their cultural treasures as ancestral embodiments.4 Kahanu emphasises how he alo ā he alo facilitated these exhibitions across cultural boundaries, thereby ultimately enabling extensive community engagement. Nepia proposes a choreographic approach to curation in his discussion of two related exhibitions he has been involved with: Binding and e He alo aˉ he alo / kanohi ki te kanohi Looping: Transfer of Presence in Contemporary Pacific Art, curated by Deborah Waite for the University of Hawai‘i (UH) at Mānoa Art

in Curatopia
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project a model of ‘the [today] times’ into the future. Macdonald and Morgan are talking not quite about ‘the times’ in Clifford’s sense but about the embodiment of ‘the times’ in their historically specific material cultures: in things – objects, images, texts, sounds, technologies, archives – that curators will have to make decisions about collecting or not collecting today. However, these things cannot be detached from collection development policies and priorities for the accumulation of things. Equally, such policies cannot be detached from ‘the times’ of

in Curatopia

temple staff and required initiation to understand statue inscriptions strikes a significant chord with the restricted physical and intellectual access to the healing statues. Summary Often of extremely fine workmanship, the healing statues are an embodiment of material practices that are likely to have been both long-lived and widespread among social groups, but which leave little archaeological trace. The statues stand, however, at the most privileged end of the spectrum of responses to affliction; they are a reflection of the concerns of a small group of literate

in Mummies, magic and medicine in ancient Egypt
Felix Kanitz and Balkan archaeology

). Contrary to the widespread belief that science is placeless, authors working in this field have shown that, like ‘temporality and embodiment’, geography is also a conditio sine qua non for scientific endeavour of any kind, since ‘spaces both enable and constrain discourse’, as Livingstone (2003: 7) nicely puts it. The concept of space in this particular case takes us to the topics of inclusion and/ or exclusion, validity, veracity, partiality, etc. Accordingly, this chapter questions the role of geography in both the nurturing and the hindering of Kanitz’s scientific

in Communities and knowledge production in archaeology
From Samoa with Love? at the Museum Fünf Kontinente, Munich

and S. Jobs (eds), Embodiments of Cultural Encounters: Cultural Encounters and the Discourses of Scholarship (Münster: Waxmann, 2011); H. Thode-Arora, From Samoa with Love? Samoan Travellers in Germany, 1895–1911: Retracing the Footsteps (Munich: Hirmer, 2014).  5 J. Habermas, Strukturwandel der Öffentlichkeit: Untersuchungen zu einer Kate­ gorie der bürgerlichen Gesellschaft (Frankfurt: Suhrkamp, 1990); J.  Habermas, The Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere: An Inquiry into a Category of Bourgeois Society (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1989).  6 See for

in Curatopia
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central government (discussed in chapter 3 in particular). In this way, there was localised control over communication routes and environmental resources. Such localised control could expand as far as international relations; the best examples of this are trading customs and dues. The ‘glocal’ is increasingly discussed in medieval studies, and the tower house is a perfect embodiment (McAlister, 2016 ). All of this reeks of a new economic and social confidence not usually associated with the medieval period. Tower houses could consequently

in The Irish tower house