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An enactive reading of the Middle English cycle plays

attention. A cognitive approach to Middle English drama: joint attention In recent years, the field of cognitive literary studies has gained great currency. Questions range from the cognitive backdrop of literary production and the cognitive engagement and investment of readers, to the representation of mental processes in and through literary texts. Experience is a key term in this trajectory, most often evoked in the context of embodiment. Embodied knowledge is an important aspect of how we experience and make sense of literature

in Enacting the Bible in medieval and early modern drama
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Harold Godwinson, the last Anglo

borderlands became shifted, at the end of the eleventh century, to the Welsh alone. For Harold, after the arrival of the Normans in Britain, the Welsh are the embodiment of violence and danger in this region. Yet despite the fact that, in the legend of the Vita Haroldi, the Welsh are depicted as a people so violent that living among them can serve as a fitting penance for Harold, his extended presence in the Welsh borderlands in the final years of his life reveals that, even after the changes brought about by the Battle of Hastings, this territory was still viewed as a

in Writing the Welsh borderlands in Anglo-Saxon England

whether the Guthlac A-poet was familiar with Felix’s text remains unanswered,39 it has been recognised that this poem departs from the core elements of this saint’s legend,40 becoming largely a description of an extended battle for the beorg. Most recently, postcolonial critics have understood Guthlac’s legend as reflecting a nascent sense of Anglo-Saxon colonial aspiration, with the Mercian saint a successful embodiment of Anglo-Saxon land conquest over native British resistance. Guthlac A has been read as ‘suffused with colonial desires’,41 and its landscape

in Writing the Welsh borderlands in Anglo-Saxon England
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Chaucer: validity in interpretation

embodiment of such teaching. 2 Secondly, even when Chaucer does provide us with explicit judgements, we are always free to read them ironically or by ‘antiphrasis’ so that they come to mean ‘the very opposite of what they say’: when Chaucer tells us that the Monk’s opinion was good, ‘he certainly means that he thinks it was bad’. The variety of forms of irony to be found

in Chaucer in context
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Real-life observation versus literary convention

as reproducing the disorder of real life but, in fact, the pilgrims may be described in the order of the zodiacal year. Thus, just as the entry of the Sun into Aries signals the beginning of the astrological year, so the first pilgrim to be described is the Knight, who, having devoted his life to crusading warfare, seems the perfect embodiment of the influence of the ‘colerik hotte signe’ ( CT , V

in Chaucer in context

Chaucer’s social vision, one which is consistent with the views found in his earlier works, and that it supplies us with the information with which to judge the character and morality of the pilgrims, predisposing us to accept or reject their particular perspective by depicting them as ideal or perverted embodiments of their estates. The second key assumption underlying conservative interpretations of Chaucer

in Chaucer in context
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has demonstrated, ontologically different. It was ‘an actual physical embodiment’ of divine presence. 14 The belief was that power resided in the object itself. 15 Religious relics ‘presented a narrative of stasis in place of horrifying change: the end of this life and bodily decomposition’. 16 If mourning and melancholia are symptoms of trying to recreate the lost object, the medieval Church claimed

in Affective medievalism
The abjection of the Middle Ages

Jos and Mia (Joseph and Mary). William F. Woods remarks that ‘they are the remnant, the embodiment of our eternal hope for the future’ ( The Medieval Filmscape , p. 79). 73 Edelman, No Future , p. 113. 74

in Affective medievalism

powerful king of Connacht, exacted tribute in cattle, and played kingmakers in their neighbouring territories. In this way, their ‘Irish’ lordship was the embodiment of aggressive French lordship as expressed in Chrétien de Troyes’s contemporary Erec et Enide: ‘I’m very rich and powerful, for in this land there’s no lord whose lands border mine who goes against my authority and does not do everything I wish. I have no neighbour who does not fear me, however proud and confident he may be.’43 But there was more to the use of Murchad Ua Máel Sechlainn in the grant of Meath

in Lordship in four realms

with a sidelong glance at the Prioress whom he is accompanying, ‘I noot to whom it myght displese’ ( CT : VII: 3166, 3260-6). 65 If the Nun’s Priest’s portrait of Chauntecleer is, like many of the pilgrims’ tales, an inadvertent comment on his own failings, then he may have to be removed from the ranks of Chaucer’s ‘good priests’, leaving only the Parson as the embodiment of the ideal secular

in Chaucer in context