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Philip Lawton

’ (Harvey, 2008; Lefebvre, 1968), ‘the just city’ (Fainstein, 2010), and Marcuse’s (2009) ‘commons planning’. Here, the chapter points to the practical means of developing the basis to a more balanced and socially orientated urban and surburban future. It is argued that the existence of vacant property and land, which in the case of the National Asset Management Agency (NAMA) is, by default at least, in state ownership, provides a platform for a shift in the approach taken towards urban liveability in Ireland. The liveable city Throughout the last number of decades, the

in Spacing Ireland
Ireland’s grassroots food growing movement
Aisling Murtagh

… is to be mercilessly put down or mocked out of existence’ (Harvey, 2001: 97–8). This creates an overwhelming sense of powerlessness, with citizens having little to no hope that they can change the system. Not all are overwhelmed, however, and small spaces of hope emerge. For example, Seyfang (2007: 117) describes an organic food co-operative as a ‘meeting place 129 Mobility, space and consumption for like-minded individuals seeking to carve out a niche in which to act’ and thus a space in which to reclaim power and retain hope, attempting to work towards

in Spacing Ireland
Going beyond a communicative approach 
Ihnji Jon

Introduction The word ‘planning’ contains so many implications that it is not easy to define it in a few sentences. According to Healey (2009) , planning is a governance practice that not only concerns existing relations but also opens up future possibilities for improving the conditions of human co-existence. In this sense, planning includes the tasks of today and the future. The tasks assigned to planning in the past were much clearer than is the case today. We used to assume, with certainty, that we could analyse and understand the problems of today and

in The power of pragmatism
Meg Holden

-making faculty of action. Justify action based upon ‘experienceable existence’. The worst excesses of humanism today come from justification through generalisation and a rush to judgement. In general terms, a 1.5 degree Celsius increase in global average temperature, a 50 cm rise in sea level, an 18 per cent decline in species richness do not sound like a devastating price to pay for persisting on a development path that is benefiting billions of people. The generalisation is deceiving, however, and the pragmatic answer is to identify the specificity and contingency of all

in The power of pragmatism
Jenny Pickerill

’ use of the technology.1 As Froehling (1997: 293) notes, cyberspace alters the nature of all politics: ‘Its very existence changes human relations inside and outside the internet through the flow of information, whether people worldwide are directly connected or not.’ Consequently, analysis needs to go beyond studying only those who are online (cf. Hill and Hughes 1998) and to include a broad examination of all the influences upon, as well as those of, the politics of cyberspace. The use of CMC might contribute to the formation of new forms and processes of politics

in Cyberprotest
Jenny Pickerill

participants previously unconnected with any other activist group. Traditionally, gaining access to protest information involved knowledge of the existence and source of underground publications, or that information came from personal contacts. Now such information is more easily located on web pages and may even be occasionally linked to from British news corporations’ websites (such as BBC Online). SchNEWS, McSpotlight, FoE and GSN have utilised CMC for this purpose. Chris (SchNEWS) believed that publishing SchNEWS electronically had attracted a new audience: ‘A lot of

in Cyberprotest
Jenny Pickerill

for forms of direct democracy is growing (see Budge 1996). Many, especially anarchists and those involved in DiY Culture, try to put their ideals into practice through their own organisations, which are structurally informal and non-hierarchical, and operationally autonomous at local community level (Rooum 1992; McKay 1998). Importantly, this is to ensure more than just an equitable form of organisation, for ‘activists begin to act as if the world they want to live in has come into existence. Prefigurative politics means acting now as you want to act in the future

in Cyberprotest
In defence of the Irish essay
Karen Babine

subject. What drives an essay is what the writer’s mind makes of it and, as a result, every subject is a possibility for an essay. A caveat The multi-layered nature of the essay as a form necessitates a multi-layered approach to studying it; that being the case, a bit of clarification is necessary. First, I realise that what I am about to discuss may sound like a manifesto for the existence and persistence of the Irish essay, but I am truly approaching this project in the exploratory, conversational, tentative spirit that has long been the defining characteristic of

in Unfolding Irish landscapes
Reading Tim Robinson through Gluaiseacht Chearta Sibhialta na Gaeltachta
Jerry White

recalls how as he first began his work on a map of Aran, he was struck by how different the process was from what he had known as a visual artist in the metropolitan centre: ‘maps of a very generalized and metaphorical sort had been latent in the abstract paintings and environmental constructions I had shown in London, in that previous existence that already seemed so long ago, but I had not engaged myself to such a detailed relationship with an actual place before’.8 That departure from a bustling metropolis, and from the intellectual practices that accompanied it, in

in Unfolding Irish landscapes
Listening in/to Tim Robinson
Gerry Smyth

Robinson’s experience, at the same time it has implications for the ways in which readers may relate to his work and, wider still, for the ethics of interpretation itself – specifically, for those forms of interpretation that we call critical analysis. For if Robinson intuits a problem with his own project, there is at the same time a question mark over the existence at this time in the Western academy of a reading technique equal to the challenge of Tim Robinson’s writing. In the meantime, the author presses on and asserts an intention to organise his study of Connemara

in Unfolding Irish landscapes