A. Altmann
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Jenefer Cockitt

For over a hundred years, palaeopathologists have studied the ancient Nubian population, examining the patterns of disease and trauma evident in the surviving human remains. Despite the remarkable amount of progress made in this area, there have been few attempts to discern whether there is enough available evidence to support the existence of a defined ancient medical tradition in the country, akin to that in neighbouring Egypt. Given the lack of textual sources for prehistoric Nubia, evidence for such a tradition must be sought in the human remains themselves. Here, an assessment will be provided of the possible palaeopathological evidence for healthcare practices in ancient Nubia, focusing in particular on the artefacts from the first Archaeological Survey of Nubia. The data presented, although tentative, represent the first point on the road to greater understanding of ancient Nubian medical traditions.

Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
David R. Law

The theological energies released by Martin Luther in 1517 created a set of theological insights and problems that eventually led to the development of kenotic Christology (i. e., the view that in order for the Son of God to become incarnate and live a genuinely human life, he emptied himself of his divine prerogatives or attributes). This article traces how kenotic Christology originated in the Eucharistic Controversy between Luther and Zwingli, before receiving its first extensive treatment in the debate between the Lutheran theologians of Tübingen and Giessen in,the early seventeenth century. Attention then turns to the nine-teenth century, when doctrinal tensions resulting from the enforced union of the Prussian Lutheran and Reformed churches created the conditions for a new flowering of kenotic Christology in the theologies of Ernst Sartorius and, subsequently, Gottfried Thomasius. Kenotic Christology ultimately originates with Luther, however, for it owes its existence to the creative theological energies he unleashed and which remain his lasting legacy.

Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Carmen M. Mangion

of her Jesuit confessor, joined the Daughters of Charity of St Vincent de Paul.52 Mary Anne Costello entered the Daughters of Charity of St Vincent de Paul on the advice of a ‘pious Irish missionary’.53 The role of the clergy was particularly important in the early years of a congregation’s existence, before educational institutions and kinship relationships began to play such an important role in introducing women to religious life. Peter Gallwey, a Jesuit based in London, was known for his ‘zealous hunger of souls’ and was a prodigious promoter of religious life

in Contested identities
Abstract only
David Geiringer

on changing values and beliefs, but an entirely new way of making sense of her existence. And ultimately, her eventual non-existence. This book is about the stories that people tell themselves about meaning, morality and being, and the way these stories changed in the second half of the twentieth century. Moreover, it’s about the everyday experiences that informed and were informed by these stories. Too often historians of

in The Pope and the pill
Stephen Penn

is some other material individuating condition. They should rather look beyond this a little, by seeking such pre-eminence in their species without reference to the individual person, and this will nevertheless be for the greater good . Errors of perception and perspective relating to universals are undoubtedly the cause of all the sin that prevails in the world! It is sufficient in such matters for someone to be of an agreeable nature and to be suitable to a particular office. If it is objected that many who deny the existence of

in John Wyclif
Abstract only
Carmen M. Mangion

Daughters of Charity occurred despite the threat of enclosure. Some groups were forcibly enclosed; others existed surreptitiously and some denied their religious status in order to exist within the Roman Catholic Church. Despite the numerous papal edicts outlawing their activities outside the cloister, support from a local bishop could safeguard their existence.6 Only enclosed religious orders were canonically recognised. Despite this lack of canonical legitimation, simple-vowed congregations grew dramatically from the late eighteenth century onwards.7 While the time span

in Contested identities
David Geiringer

human existence as well as the material consequences of embodied religious belief and practice’. 108 Concurrent with these trends, there has been an attempt to do away with approaches to both sex and religion that obsessively pursue ‘meaning’, and treat them instead as lived moments of experience. As Colin Jones argued at his plenary lecture at the 2014 Social History Society conference, historians have made a totem out of

in The Pope and the pill
Abstract only
Carmen M. Mangion

religious activists and links the services they performed to their religious identity. Their religious beliefs and practices were at the core of their existence and integral to their working lives. As missionaries, they were builders of the Roman Catholic Church and were a key factor in the extension of religious devotion and the consolidation 17 Report on the Visitation of Females at their Own Homes in the City of Westminster (1854), p. 3. 18 Catherine Hall, ‘The Early Formation of Victorian Domestic Ideology’, in Sandra Burman, ed., Fit Work for Women (London: Croom

in Contested identities
David Geiringer

were understood, and also drivers of everyday actions and material existence. As we shall see, a rigid dichotomy between the ‘discursive’ and the ‘experiential’ is itself a historically specific problematic when tracing the relationship between sex and religion in the post-war years. I intend to build on the insights of Green and focus on the decisions that are made by the interviewees when narrating

in The Pope and the pill