Irish republican media activism since the Good Friday Agreement
Author: Paddy Hoey

Newspapers, magazines and pamphlets have always been central, almost sacred, forms of communication within Irish republican political culture. While social media is becoming the primary ideological battleground in many democracies, Irish republicanism steadfastly expresses itself in the traditional forms of activist journalism.

Shinners, Dissos and Dissenters is a long-term analysis of the development of Irish republican activist media since 1998 and the tumultuous years following the end of the Troubles. It is the first in-depth analysis of the newspapers, magazines and online spaces in which the differing strands of Irish republicanism developed and were articulated during a period where schism and dissent defined a return to violence.

Based on an analysis of Irish republican media outlets as well as interviews with the key activists that produced them, this book provides a compelling long-term snapshot of a political ideology in transition. It reveals how Irish Republicanism was moulded by the twin forces of the Northern Ireland Peace Process and the violent internal ideological schism that threatened a return to the ‘bad old days’ of the Troubles.

This book is vital for those studying Irish politics and those interestedin activism as it provides new insights into the role that modern activist media forms have played in the ideological development of a 200-year-old political tradition.

From Manchester United as a ‘global leisure brand’ to FC United as a ‘community club’
George Poulton

of a PhD research project (Poulton 2013). As part of the ethnography, I also drew on textual sources, analysing the supporters’ internet forum, online blogs written by supporters and ‘fanzines’, fan written and produced magazines sold at low cost around matches or in local shops, which were a key part of the group culture.1 In this material, supporters often used identifiers such as ‘A.H’, ‘House of Style’ and ‘Red Heads’ rather than real names. In addition, I conducted archival research studying Manchester United fanzines from the late 1980s onwards, which allowed

in Realising the city
Abstract only
David Ranc

critical of the press, which is particularly perceptible in their written productions (fanzines, internet forums) and in interviews. Resent revolved chiefly around the question of violence. Violence Within the French context, violence has long been a unique feature in the behaviour of some PSG supporters and has, therefore, attracted particular interest from the journalists. Periods of relative calm (1993–2004) with the occasional upsurge of violence (PSG–Galatasaray in 2001) have been followed by more widespread fights. As of 2010, there have been ongoing fights between

in Foreign players and football supporters
David Ranc

large enough. Supporters were fairly repetitive, since they were asked about fairly general issues on which there is a general level of agreement. The interviews indeed only served to triangulate (or cross-check) the findings made through the study of the press and of available media from the supporters (fanzines, internet, etc.). Yet the methodological challenges posed by fans of both clubs were different. Arsenal supporters were very responsive to enquiries for face-to-face or email interviews. Parisian supporters have proved more difficult. They commonly feel

in Foreign players and football supporters
Fourthwrite and the Blanket
Paddy Hoey

inspiration was primarily the style and spirit of the Southern Californian punk fanzine Flipside rather than An Phoblacht: ‘I was introduced to this world through fanzines and free information sheets at record stores and I soon started doing my own fanzine. The Do-It-Yourself ethic, that anyone could make their own media was always important to me.’57 However, it is remarkable that her vision for her magazine instinctively drew on a culture of dissent which sought to highlight inconsistencies within mainstream republican dogma as the older mosquito press had done sixty

in Shinners, Dissos and Dissenters
Ian Goodyer

that could help them negotiate the aesthetic landscape of punk. Given the breadth of RAR’s cultural influences it is clear that the movement did more than simply appropriate punk’s stylistic conventions. Temporary Hoarding is a case in point. Several commentators claim that the RAR journal simply aped the style and format of amateur fanzines, and indeed there is an undeniable influence in terms of typography, imagery and layout. However, the magazine’s designers reject the charge of plagiarism. Syd Shelton and Ruth Gregory make it clear that, c05.indd 119 6

in Crisis music
David Ranc

in fanzines)47 and is reasserted periodically by supporters, notably of the national team.48 Women also still seem marginalised within football in England. They are mostly seen as merely one of three elements providing entertainment to the supporter: the ‘booze, betting and birds’ trilogy.49 Ranc, Foreign Players and Football Supporters.indd 16 19/12/2011 14:21:41 Understanding partisan identification 17 Nevertheless, two related insights from Russell are particularly relevant to this study. Russell contends that the local press had a major role to play in the

in Foreign players and football supporters
Abstract only
David Ranc

then resort to alternative sources to the press to read about their teams and, to paraphrase Mignon, learn about the games, events surrounding the team and most importantly to share their analyses. Fanzines have been the first alternative medium but the relatively recent development of the internet has multiplied the number of sources of information for the supporters: on-line releases from news agencies (such as AFP or Reuters) and supporters-run forums, websites or mailing lists. The press must therefore be envisaged as only one actor among others in the definition

in Foreign players and football supporters
How the Communist Party of Great Britain discovered punk rock
Matthew Worley

quo’.50 Conclusion The YCL’s embrace of punk has been well documented elsewhere.51 Following Bradshaw’s lead, Challenge lent support to the ‘new wave’ from early 1977 via approving summaries of the emergent scene, positive record reviews and, belatedly, support for RAR.52 Not only did the paper’s language and design transform ever closer to a superficially ‘punk’ style through 1977–79, mimicking the cut ’n’ paste aesthetic of fanzines and the 48 CPGB, The British Road to Socialism (London: CPGB, 1978). Recognition of the ‘specific problems’ of young people as a

in Labour and working-class lives
Abstract only
David Ranc

sources of information instead, such as the internet, radio, television, and for the older generation, fanzines. This resentment and disaffection are nevertheless fairly weak (especially if compared to PSG). Journalists have already registered that the press is nowadays only one source of information among others and act accordingly. Indeed, according to Matt Scott, the goal of a newspaper nowadays is ‘to inform and stimulate the dialogue among fans happening on internet forums’. It therefore appears that the English press, tabloids and broadsheets alike, are actually

in Foreign players and football supporters