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time be compelled to yield it back to the giver. The county towns, as an elite class of regional centres which was largely defined by about 1100, would always be seen from the point of view of royal government as means for the expression and assertion of central authority. 1 Meanwhile, a second and no less significant basis of urban rule lay in customary practices of self-regulation in the neighbourhoods which made up the town

in Towns in medieval England
C. E. Beneš

Here follows part six , which discusses the secular government of the city of Genoa. This part has three chapters: the first recounts how the city of Genoa has been governed by a variety of regimes. The second explains that it is safer to be ruled by one than by the many , unless that many is united for good. The third details the danger that arises

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
Selected sources

This book is the first collection of translated sources on towns in medieval England between 1100 and 1500. Drawing on a variety of written evidence for the significan and dynamic period, it provides an overview of English medieval urban history. Readers are invited to consider the challenges and opportunities presented by a wide range of sources. The merchant, for example, is seen from different angles - as an economic agent, as a religious patron and in Chaucer's fictional depiction. The prominence of London and the other major cities is reflected in the selection, but due attention is also given to a number of small market towns. Occasions of conflict are represented, as are examples of groups and societies which both contributed to and helped to contain the tensions within urban society. Changing indicators of wealth and poverty are considered, together with evidence for more complex questions concerning the quality of life in the medieval town. The book moves between the experience of urban life and contemporary perceptions of it - from domestic furnishings to legends of civic origins and plays in which townspeople enacted their own history.

Editor: C. E. Beneš

This book provides the first English translation of the Chronicle of the city of Genoa by the thirteenth-century Dominican Jacopo da Varagine (also known as Jacobus de Voragine). While Jacopo is better known for his monumental compilation of saints’ lives, the Golden legend, his lesser known Chronicle of Genoa exemplifies the important medieval genre of the civic chronicle. The work mixes scholarly research about the city’s origins with narrative accounts based on Genoese archival sources, more didactic and moral reflections on the proper conduct of public and private life, and personal accounts of Jacopo’s own experience as archbishop of Genoa from 1292 until his death in 1298. Divided into twelve parts, the work covers the history of Genoa from its ancient origins up to Jacopo’s own day. Jacopo’s first-hand accounts of events in which he himself participated—such as the great civic reconciliation of 1295, over which he himself presided—provide a valuable contrast to the more scholarly and didactic sections of the work. Together they form an integrated, coherent approach to urban history, which illustrates some of the most important styles of historiography in the Middle Ages.

Abstract only
C. E. Beneš

chronicles while also investigating the words of other authors, however, we have found certain details about the city of Genoa that we have decided to transcribe in the present fashion: among these are expressed something of the city of Genoa, as well as its age and founder; a rationale for its name is given, and many useful things are explained. 6 And since we mentioned the form of government by which Genoa is ruled and

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
Abstract only
C. E. Beneš

-run governments of what became essentially independent city-states all across northern Italy. While they generally thought of themselves as republican, they were hardly democratic, and usually favoured the political participation of the local nobility and/or wealthy urban elites. 14 Nonetheless, the combination of economic growth, political autonomy, and clear physical demarcation—i.e. by city

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
C. E. Beneš

.23. 24 TIE 113, from Augustine, City of God 4.4. The pirate is not named in Augustine; Jacopo was probably recalling the story as told in John of Salisbury, Policraticus 3.14; see discussion in Cary ( 1956 ), pp. 95–8. The story also appears in Ptolemy of Lucca's near-contemporaneous On the government of rulers 3

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
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E.A. Jones

religion he was broadly conservative) became the government’s principal agent in the dissolution of the monasteries in Oxford, Reading, and the neighbouring counties of Warwickshire and Northamptonshire. Excerpted and modernised from the English original in Henry Ellis, ed., Original Letters illustrative of English History, including numerous royal letters, from autographs in the British Museum … and one or

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
E.A. Jones

). 16 Caroline M. Barron, London in the Later Middle Ages: Government and people 1200–1500 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010), p. 312. 17 See Cartulary of St. Bartholomew’s Hospital, founded 1123: A calendar , edited by Nellie J.M. Kerling (London: St Bartholomew’s Hospital, 1973), nos 868, 1036, app. I

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
C. E. Beneš

. 59 Ptolemy of Lucca makes the same point: On the government of rulers 3.4.5. 60 Cicero, De officiis 1.85. 61 TIE 1136: Augustine, City of God 18.19; Valerius Maximus

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa