Search results

innovation which quickly became established as a stage tradition. The reputation of the Highland regiments, especially during the Napoleonic Wars, lent a new prestige and glamour to the wearing of tartan. These battalions had been specifically exempted from the ban on Highland dress in the Disarming Act of 1746 and thereafter the kilt was forever associated with the heroic deeds of the Scottish soldier. During the phase of intense patriotism during the wars with France many of the Scottish volunteer corps and fencible regiments which flourished for a short time all over

in Clanship to crofters’ war

This chapter highlights the fact that morale is a force that comes from within, and which makes a soldier carry out his duty, but can be influenced by external factors such as regimental loyalty, efficient administration, good leadership and patriotism. It considers a number of methodological issues that are of relevance in developing the study of British Expeditionary Force units. The differences between discipline in Irish and other British regiments are considered, and comparisons between civil and military law are made. Irish soldiers can much more meaningfully be compared with their counterparts in the Scottish highland regiments than with French colonial or Austro-Hungarian troops. Finally, the chapter discusses an issue surrounding discipline and morale that can be meaningfully considered in a thematic form, namely the attempts made to maintain high morale in the Irish regiments during the Great War.

in The Irish regiments in the Great War

produced and the soldiers who fought on both sides. Old heroes made new: Highlanders One result was that those regiments serving with both Havelock and Campbell received disproportionate press coverage. As chance would have it, several Highland regiments (or contingents of those regiments) served with both men during the first and second reliefs of Lucknao. 14 Moreover, it

in Martial races
Abstract only
The inter-imperial uses of a racially gendered language

Soldiers in Scottish Highland regiments were no less constructed than their counterparts in the Indian Army. In fact, perhaps because they were British soldiers and thus more familiar to Britons, both officers and public commentators were more candid about the artificiality of ‘Highlandness’ within the regiments. By the late nineteenth century, it was common knowledge that the kilted Highland regiments

in Martial races
Life as a ‘martial race’ soldier

of martial races, it seems that many Sikhs entered military service not because they loved it, but because they had to. In the Highlands, the situation was both similar and different. In the end, soldiers who enlisted in the Highland regiments tended, like their Sikh counterparts, to do so out of necessity. The reasons, too, stemmed from the painful process of integrating the

in Martial races
Abstract only

highland regiments than with French colonial or Austro-Hungarian troops.19 Equally, such generalisations can be based on a crude caricature of discipline in the British army. As 2471Intro 6/2/03 4 12:04 pm Page 4 The Irish regiments in the Great War Gary Sheffield has shown, the manner in which disciplinary measures were employed differed markedly between units and discipline in a regular battalion took a very different form to that in a Territorial Force unit.20 The present work came about as an attempt to re-evaluate discipline and morale in the British army as

in The Irish regiments in the Great War
Abstract only

strategies in terms of race and masculinity to keep politically suspect recruits out of the army. In Britain, however, most Britons were perfectly aware that the Highland regiments were not ethnically ‘pure’. In that context, then, the superlative qualities of Highland soldiers functioned as an inspirational tool, an image of ideal masculinity and racial superiority to which all potential recruits could

in Martial races
James Hogg’s deconstruction of Scottish military masculinities in The Three Perils of Man, or War, Women, and Witchcraft!

propose that in Hogg’s medieval ‘chivalric romance’, cannibalism and hunger deconstruct the ideology of self-sacrifice of the British soldier. The anonymous reviewer of the Monthly Censor might have feared the impact that Hogg’s novel could have had on the public’s opinion about British militarism which, at the time, was promoted through the myth of the Highland warrior. Heather Streets contends that though ‘most Britons were perfectly aware that the Highland regiments were not ethnically “pure” … the superlative qualities of Highland soldiers functioned as an

in Martial masculinities

Highland regiments have been seen as resolving the conflicts of Scottish history. 46 There can also be little doubt that the image and reputation of Scots regiments in the British Empire had an effect upon the national self-image of Scotland, even if recruitment was so often a badge of economic problems and unemployment. Some Scots soldiers remained overseas as settlers, but the returning soldier

in The Scots in South Africa

imitation of the highly distinctive Highland military music – frequently with such success that the strength of the Indian pipe bands rivalled those in actual Highland regiments. Moreover, Highland dress was adopted on more than one occasion by Indian ‘martial race’ regiments. In one noted example, guest nights in the officers’ mess of the 2nd Gurkha regiment featured Gurkhas dressed in kilts, who entered

in Martial races