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José Luís Fiori

This article explores the significance to the inter-state capitalist system of the new US national security strategy, as defined by the Donald Trump administration on 17 December 2017. By looking beyond the inconsistencies and idiosyncrasies of President Trump, we see that this strategy represents a break, not only with the strategies of recent US administrations but also with a longer tradition in US foreign policy. This article proposes that the supposed crisis of ‘liberal order’ is a direct and inevitable result of the expansion and success of the inter-state capitalist system. To explain the strategy of the US in this scenario, the article adopts an unorthodox approach, analysing the myth of the Tower of Babel.

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
A Focus on Community Engagement
Frédéric Le Marcis
,
Luisa Enria
,
Sharon Abramowitz
,
Almudena-Mari Saez
, and
Sylvain Landry B. Faye

no rights. Focusing on intermediaries, mediation and in particular on the role of the cadets sociaux enables us to show how social dynamics are re-enacted in a context of crisis. Background Historical analyses have attributed the failure of the Guinean, Liberian and Sierra Leonian governmental responses at the onset of the epidemic to a number of factors related to history and international political economy. They range from the

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Corporations, Celebrities and the Construction of the Entrepreneurial Refugee Woman
Annika Bergman Rosamond
and
Catia Gregoratti

. , Roberts , A. and Tornhill , S. ( 2018 ), ‘ Corporations, Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment: Feminism Co-opted? ’, in Nölke , A. and May , C. (eds), Handbook of the International Political Economy of the Corporation ( Cheltenham

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Barry Cannon

, the chapter will use a structure drawn from Susan Strange’s book States and Markets based on four areas of political economy – finance, production, security and knowledge. Strange’s structure is one of the best-known and most accessible IPE frameworks. 1 Strange’s framework of analysis for international political economy is based on four basic values: (i) wealth; (ii) security; (iii) freedom; and (iv) justice. Each society, she maintains, gives different weighting to each of these values, which in turn affects the balance between the

in Hugo Chávez and the Bolivarian revolution
Context, causes, characteristics and consequences
Barry Cannon

answers to these questions provide us with our required working concept of populism, they also lead us to broader and more profound questions which the literature on populism sometimes does not fully answer, such as: What is democracy? Why is democracy so fragile in Latin America? What is political legitimacy? How is political legitimacy gained and secured? For answers to questions such as these it is necessary to enter into broader, more universal, literatures, on the nature of democracy, on politics, on international political economy, on history and on ideology. To

in Hugo Chávez and the Bolivarian revolution
Kees van der Pijl

Desai, ‘Look back in hope? Reassessing Fordism today’. In Kees van der Pijl, ed., Handbook of the International Political Economy of Production. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar, 2015, p. 210. 16 See my Global Rivalries from the Cold War to Iraq. London:  Pluto and New Delhi:  Sage Vistaar, 2006, ch. 5. 17 See Mike Davis, Prisoners of the American Dream: Politics and Economy in the History of the US Working Class. London: Verso, 1986, especially Part II, ‘The age of Reagan’, and on Thatcherite Britain, Henk Overbeek, Global Capitalism and National Decline: The Thatcher

in Flight MH17, Ukraine and the new Cold War
Andrew Williams

ideally be; c) the reinforcement of these practices by the maintenance and reinforcement of a network of international economic organisations (of which the Bretton Woods institutions are by far the most important), and, to a lesser extent, the enforcement of a system of ‘economic containment’92 against states that refuse to cooperate with these principles and institutions. After hegemony? American leadership and the 1990 NWO One of the main arguments of the 1980s and 1990s in international political economy is about whether, unlike in 1945, there has been an end of

in Failed imagination?
Abstract only
Andrew Williams

political economy, that we are now entering a world where the state is no longer the only, or even the most important, actor in global politics. These commentators also point to the increasing escape from the purview of the state of many of the key regulatory functions over such activity as financial transactions. Geoffrey Underhill uses this observation to ask ‘[w]hether one [can] characterise … the new situation as order or disorder …’.28 It is also now criticised by those who assert, not without some justification, that order, stability and balance are inevitably to

in Failed imagination?
Abstract only
Kees van der Pijl

the International Political Economy of Production. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar, 2015. 99 Sakwa, ‘The Eurasian elites’, p. 5. 100 Mahdi Darius Nazemroaya, The Globalization of NATO [foreword Denis J. Halliday]. Atlanta: Clarity Press, 2012, p. 36. 101 Leslie Elliott Armijo, ‘The BRICs countries (Brazil, Russia, India, and China) as analytical category: mirage or insight?’ Asian Perspective, 31 (4) 2007, p. 12. 67 Divided Ukraine 67 102 Yanis Varoufakis, The Global Minotaur: America, Europe and the Future of the Global Economy [rev. edn]. London: Zed Books

in Flight MH17, Ukraine and the new Cold War
Abstract only
A failed state on NATO’s frontline
Kees van der Pijl

CyberBerkut, ‘CyberBerkut hacked web-​sites of Anton Gerashchenko’. 184 Jan P. Nederveen Pieterse, ‘Political and economic brinkmanship’. Review of International Political Economy, 14 (3) 2007, pp. 467–​86. 185 Greenwald, No Place to Hide.

in Flight MH17, Ukraine and the new Cold War