Search results

Abstract only
Cara Delay

’s working-class mothers prayed with their rosary beads ‘in church, home, on the street, in shops or queues, almost anywhere’.3 These accounts illustrate that lay Irish women came to represent faith and nation in the modern age. They testify to the central positions that lay women held in the religious worlds of nineteenth and twentieth-century Ireland even as they document both changes and continuities in how women practiced their faith from the post-famine decades to 1950. In the immediate aftermath of the Great Famine, the Irish Catholic Church remained institutionally

in Irish women and the creation of modern Catholicism, 1850–1950
Cara Delay

a world remained; thus, the need for women to commit themselves to zeal for the Virgin only intensified. Scholars including Andrea Ebel Brożyna, Gerardine Meaney, and Catherine Innes have argued that the Virgin celebrated by the modern Irish Catholic Church was fundamentally, and deliberately, passive. ‘Paintings and statues of Mary popular in nineteenth- and early twentieth-century Ireland’, writes Brożyna, tend to be very different from Renaissance depictions of robust Madonnas, sometimes seen suckling the infant Jesus. She is most frequently portrayed as fully

in Irish women and the creation of modern Catholicism, 1850–1950