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Breda Gray

3995 Migrations.qxd:text 5/8/13 11:39 Page 55 3 Migrant integration and the ‘network-making power’ of the Irish Catholic Church Breda Gray Introduction In this chapter I discuss the Irish Catholic Church as both a bureaucratic hierarchal institution and transnational network that promotes migrant integration and welfare via ‘network-making power’ (Castells, 2009, 2011). The Catholic Church has always channelled flows of religious values, information and people. However, my focus here is on the network-making power of the Irish Catholic Church in shaping the

in Migrations
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Ireland in a global world
Series: Irish Society

Migration to and from Ireland is often the subject of definitive claims. During the 1980s, migration from Ireland was most commonly described as a brain drain. Despite the constant flows and counterflows, academic studies tend to focus on just one direction of movement, reflecting dominant concerns at particular points in time. The 1950s and the 1980s are characterized as decades of emigration, the Celtic Tiger era as a period of immigration, and the current recession is manifest as a return to mass emigration. This book addresses the three key themes from a variety of spatial, temporal and theoretical perspectives. The theme of networks is addressed. Transnational loyalist networks acted both to facilitate the speaking tours of loyalist speakers and to re-translate the political meanings and messages being communicated by the speakers. The Irish Catholic Church and specifically its re-working of its traditional pastoral, lobbying and development role within Irish emigrant communities, is discussed. By highlighting three key areas such as motives, institutions and strategies, and support infrastructures, the book suggests that the Irish experience offers a nuanced understanding of the different forms of networks that exist between a state and its diaspora, and shows the importance of working to support the self-organization of the diaspora. Perceptions of belonging both pre- and postmigration encouraged ethnographic research in six Direct Provision asylum accommodation centres across Ireland. Finally, the book provides insights into the intersections between 'migrancy' and other social categories including gender, nationality and class/position in the labour hierarchy.

Irish-American fables of resistance
Eamonn Wall

  105 6 The poetry of accumulation: Irish-​American fables of resistance Eamonn Wall Writing on Eiléan Ni Chuilleanáin’s poetry, Andrew J.  Auge, in a devastating piece of reportage, describes the recent change that has taken place in the reputation and role of Irish Catholic Church:  ‘by the turn of the millennium, the once imposing edifice of Irish Catholicism appeared increasingly derelict’ (Auge 2013:  145). Given all we have learned from reports into how the Church has dealt with abuses committed by its clergy and cover-​ups initiated by its hierarchy, it

in Tracing the cultural legacy of Irish Catholicism
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The place of migration
Mary Gilmartin and Allen White

speaking tours of Loyalist Protestant ministers. Here local institutional geographies are shaped through successive waves of migrants (including visitors like the ministers). These local geographies also acted as the context within which appeals to transnational (British and imperial) political and socio-cultural identities could be made intelligible. For Gray, the multiple responses of the Irish Catholic Church to flows and flux of migrants to and from Ireland reflect the ways these processes change and transform the institutional landscape in surprising, often

in Migrations
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Karin Fischer

and the dominant political ideology in the Republic of Ireland have contributed to perpetuating most of the existing system and its inherent inequalities. An increasing number of Irish educationalists and commentators for their part have voiced the need for change and insisted on the ‘urgency to question the taken-for-granted structures of the education system’, spurred on more recently by the successive scandals that have brought discredit to the Irish Catholic Church since the revelations of the Ryan and Murphy reports in 2009.4 In successive opinion polls, the

in Schools and the politics of religion and diversity in the Republic of Ireland
Tracing the transformation of Irish Catholicism through the eyes of a journalist
Patsy McGarry

believed and managements and editors would never have held out against a massed attack by the all-​powerful Irish Catholic Church. From first-​hand experience I  witnessed one of the worst of the Christian Brothers break into the office of the manager and demand that a court case that mentioned Artane (the largest industrial school in Dublin) should not be used. Before the manager could lift a phone he would push open the editorial door to tell us the manager had instructed that the case be dumped. He got away with this just one more time. On the third time of demanding

in Tracing the cultural legacy of Irish Catholicism
A time of hope!
Vincent Twomey

, the educational, health-​care and social-​care systems being run by the Church (financially and administratively this was much to the advantage of the State), the Irish Catholic Church was a political force to be reckoned with –​and politicians knew this, and, with some notable exceptions, respected it. Their own Catholic faith deepened that respect, even when more evident political motivations were present. At a time when, as a nation, we had no real political representation, the Irish Catholic Church created a sense of identity and dignity both collective and

in Tracing the cultural legacy of Irish Catholicism
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Ireland’s referendum and the journey from Gemeinschaft to Gesellschaft
Eugene O’Brien

sacramental nature, the Irish Catholic Church was creating what Julia Kristeva sees as a national community which is ‘not a political one but organic, evolutionary, at the same time vital and metaphysical –​the expression of a nearly irrational and indiscernible spirit that is summed up by the word Gemeinsinn’ (1991: 176–​7). Thus, marriage, from this perspective of maintaining the seminal significance and organic nature of the Irish Gemeinschaft, came to be of central importance, and over the years, the Church, with the compliance of the State, made sure that marriage was

in Tracing the cultural legacy of Irish Catholicism
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The Conference of Religious in Ireland (Justice Commission)
Joe Larragy

from the official line of the Irish Catholic Church hierarchy on the major economic challenges of recent decades. Moreover, while the Catholic hierarchy in Ireland has a longstanding concordat with the secular elite, CORI Justice has often been viewed as the bane of politicians and the civil service.1 At the same time, while radical in many ways, CORI Justice does not portray itself as inspired by liberation theology, is much more likely to refer to the teachings of the Second Vatican Council, and frequently makes reference to its roots in Catholic social teaching

in Asymmetric engagement
The place of religion
Karin Fischer

The influx of people of diverse origins, cultures and religions further increased the proportion of the population not identifying itself with Catholicism or even with Christianity. A number of migrants did join the ranks of the main Irish Churches, however, starting with the strong Polish Catholic minority. The 150,000 or so Polish immigrants of the 2000s were welcomed with open arms by the Irish Catholic Church. The main religious newspaper, The Irish Catholic, started including a page in Polish in July 2006, and the Catholic Ireland News website announced that

in Schools and the politics of religion and diversity in the Republic of Ireland