Search results

Persia, masculinity, and conversion in early seventeenth-century travel writing and drama
Chloë Houston

culture. The study of conversion between Christianity and Islam has occupied scholars interested in how religious identity was constructed in post-Reformation Europe, as well as those looking in particular at the relationship between the two religions. 2 The function of gender identity in relation to conversion has often been involved in these discussions

in Conversions
Abstract only
Matthew Dimmock

religious conversions did take place, but when they were narrated at all they were conspicuously presented as a personal, inward matter of little wider import. Such actions were also largely the preserve of men. One prominent example is that of Harry St. John Bridger Philby (later Sheikh Abdullah), English agent in the Arabian Peninsula, and his 1930 conversion to the Wahhabi Islam of the new Saudi state he later came to

in Conversions
Allegories of the Armada
Margaret Christian

Catholicism and Islam, both personified as women, to support his contention that Islam is “in” Catholicism: The Church of the beloued is fayre, and fayrest of all women. Idolatrous churches are foule, and euill fauored women: and of all foule and euill fauored, I thinke the church of Rome to be one of the foulest of women. The evill fauoredness of Mahomets woman or church, is in this euill fauored Romish woman. That euill fauored Mahomets woman or church defendeth many wiues:  This Romish church defendeth stewes and strumpets, curtizanes, concubines, & boy harlots. Mahomets

in Spenserian allegory and Elizabethan biblical exegesis
Gender and conversion in the early modern Mediterranean
Eric Dursteler

In 1592, Francesco Mosca, an inhabitant of the Venetian town of Sebenico (modern-day Šibenik, Croatia) on the north-eastern Adriatic coast, converted to Islam, or in the parlance of the day, ‘turned Turk’. He had long had a disreputable reputation throughout the region: this was certainly due, in no small part, to his ‘profession’ of ‘killing

in Conversions
Susan Frye

female figures from a variety of Graeco-Roman narratives located in Italy, Asia Minor and the Levant, which in early modern England included Egypt and the Mediterranean islands. Chosen in the 1570s, the locations of these narratives were highly suggestive of contemporary activities in these same locations. Bess’s pictured spaces do not just stay in the past, but keep slipping into her present, overlapping with the developing trade routes, and diplomatic and cultural exchanges that England was establishing under Elizabeth in the Islamic world.15 During the last twenty

in Bess of Hardwick
Abstract only
Erotic commodification, cross-cultural conversion, and the bed-trick on the English stage, 1580–1630
Daniel Vitkus

political gain. 2 When a Christian converted to Islam, this was nearly always described as a betrayal motivated by avarice, lust, or a combination of both. An English captivity narrative from 1622, The famous and wonderful recovery of a ship of Bristol , claimed that many Christian captives in North Africa converted to Islam because they were tortured or threatened with violence, but

in Conversions
Abstract only
Simon Ditchfield and Helen Smith

work on conversion has emphasised its pragmatic and often prosaic nature, with converts changing faith rather for social, financial, or familial reasons than because of divine inspiration. Natalie Rothman, for example, narrates the case of Abdone, son of Giovanni of Aleppo, who changed faith on multiple occasions: ‘When being Christian was inconvenient, he practiced Islam: when it became convenient

in Conversions
Abstract only
A context for The Faerie Queene
Margaret Christian

the Spanish Armada, in dialogue with sermons that use Bible stories to develop the same message. Thomas Drant, preaching in 1584, Meredith Hanmer (1586), and William Gravet (1587) demonstrate how ­preachers drew a comparison between Islam and Roman Catholicism, just as Spenser would, while sermons celebrating the defeat itself (by John Prime, Thomas White, and Stephen Gosson) show how Spenser and the preachers drew on the same biblical themes and even motifs:  horses, chariot, and hardware, all agents of God’s judgment. The threat Mary Stuart posed to Elizabeth was

in Spenserian allegory and Elizabethan biblical exegesis
Abstract only
The Spanish Tragedy IV.iv in performance
Tony Howard

Istanbul to condone the terror in New York?’ The answer, he argued, ‘is not Islam or what is idiotically described as the clash between East and West or poverty itself. It is the feeling of impotence deriving from degradation, the failure to be understood, and the inability of such people to make their voices heard.’ 33 In Snow , published a few months later, viewers are again watching television when

in Doing Kyd
Abstract only
Pavel Drábek and M. A. Katritzky

argument made by Lezra may be deployed to infer that Western Europe shapes and uses its civic aspirations to define itself against and in contrast to the enemy beyond , so often associated in the early modern imagination with the East in the broadest sense of cosmography – be it the dangerous and wily Ottoman Empire, the Islamic world, African tribal kingdoms, or the enticing realm of the mystical Orient

in Transnational connections in early modern theatre