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thoughts of a young visitor to Europe just over a hundred years ago never less than fascinating to read. In particular, it seemed important for once to be somehow in touch with my mother’s family history. For a number of years it had been my father’s life, in Germany in the 1930s and as a refugee in England, interned for a year in the Isle of Man, that had preoccupied me. On my mother’s side, the dramas of persecution and flight were less immediate, a pre-history to her own life and experience. Even her parents were small children when anti-semitic pogroms in eastern

in Writing otherwise
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Textual spectrality and Finnegans Wake

/04/2014 12:23 Textual spectrality and Finnegans Wake 9 myth cycle. He represents a wide-spectrum of Celtic traditions from Ireland, Scotland, and the Isle of Man; his multiple lineages challenge the modern notion of a definitive Celtic stock. Len Platt observes, ‘all attempts to assert the Self by denying the Other are problematized as unstable in the multipleness of Finnegans Wake.’55 In fact, the Self/Other binary is problematized to the point that an authentic Self or an authentic Other ‘is ridiculed, not just through “allusions,” but as a product of the Wake

in Haunted historiographies

Pastoral Poetry of the English Renaissance contains the text of the poems with brief headnotes giving date, source and other basic information, and footnotes with full annotation.

in Pastoral poetry of the English Renaissance
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, printers to the University], 1633, pp. 43–54 of the separately paginated section containing the Eclogues and ‘Poeticall Miscellanies’ (sigs F2r–G3v). 220. Phineas Fletcher, ‘To My Beloved Thenot in Answer of His Verse’ Text based on Phineas Fletcher, The Purple Island … together with Piscatorie Eclogs and other Poeticall Miscellanies, Cambridge [Thomas Buck and Roger Daniel, printers to the University], 1633, pp. 65–6 (sig. I1r–v). 221. Phineas Fletcher, from The Purple Island Text based on Phineas Fletcher, The Purple Island, or The Isle of Man, Cambridge [Thomas Buck

in A Companion to Pastoral Poetry of the English Renaissance
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shepherd, as in the piece by Robert Chester (#137). Not unlike the shepherds of pastoral, the tenants of such an estate seem to labour little and obtain much, looked after by nature and by the lord. The latter might himself become a master-­shepherd, as in Chester’s piece: a ‘Lordlike sheapheard lord of vs’ (#137.26). At the other end of the spectrum, there is a striking variation of the same design in Thomas Weaver’s poem on the Isle of Man (#261), where the whole island becomes (as in fact it was) the estate of James Stanley, Earl of Derby. Manxmen enjoy the same

in A Companion to Pastoral Poetry of the English Renaissance