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The Stanleys of Derby on the English Renaissance stage

in June, 1565 and there were two Englishmen with the force. One of them, Sir Edward Stanley, is almost certainly identifiable as the uncle of Ferdinando Stanley, Lord Strange – by whose acting company The Jew of Malta was performed. This Sir Edward Stanley had been implicated in a plot in 1571 to rescue Mary, Queen of Scots, and take her to the Isle of Man and was ‘listed

in Shakespeare’s histories and counter-histories
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, printers to the University], 1633, pp. 43–54 of the separately paginated section containing the Eclogues and ‘Poeticall Miscellanies’ (sigs F2r–G3v). 220. Phineas Fletcher, ‘To My Beloved Thenot in Answer of His Verse’ Text based on Phineas Fletcher, The Purple Island … together with Piscatorie Eclogs and other Poeticall Miscellanies, Cambridge [Thomas Buck and Roger Daniel, printers to the University], 1633, pp. 65–6 (sig. I1r–v). 221. Phineas Fletcher, from The Purple Island Text based on Phineas Fletcher, The Purple Island, or The Isle of Man, Cambridge [Thomas Buck

in A Companion to Pastoral Poetry of the English Renaissance
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shepherd, as in the piece by Robert Chester (#137). Not unlike the shepherds of pastoral, the tenants of such an estate seem to labour little and obtain much, looked after by nature and by the lord. The latter might himself become a master-­shepherd, as in Chester’s piece: a ‘Lordlike sheapheard lord of vs’ (#137.26). At the other end of the spectrum, there is a striking variation of the same design in Thomas Weaver’s poem on the Isle of Man (#261), where the whole island becomes (as in fact it was) the estate of James Stanley, Earl of Derby. Manxmen enjoy the same

in A Companion to Pastoral Poetry of the English Renaissance